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A 1793 Miniature By Connecticut Artist John Trumbull Turns Up A lost miniature painting by Connecticut son and Revolutionary War-era painter John Trumbull has been found in southwest England, where it was mislabeled for generations. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: January 31, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_013109.asp

A Career Gets A Trim Queen City Barber Shop closed at the end of June, 2006. The owner, Luigi DeMarco has cut hair for more than 60 years, but will be retiring since the building his shop is in, the former Hastings Hotel and Conference Center, will soon be the Connecticut Culinary Institute. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: June 29, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/neighborhoods/htfd_courant_062906.asp

A Contrast To New Haven's Discrimination Case Stan Simpson writes that the HFD is a model for how a department can diversify its personnel without compromising competence. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: May 09, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_050909.asp

A Downtown Believer To The End On May 12, 2007, Joanne Douglas will bid farewell to her longtime Hartford store, The Unique Antique, and turn over the keys to a new owner. For more than 20 years, Douglas, 65, has owned and operated the shop, buying and selling such rarities as 100-year-old cameo brooches and Civil War-era mourning jewelry fashioned from the braided hair of fallen loved ones. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: April 20, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/EconomicDevelopment/htfd_courant_042007.asp

A Drug-Addicted Past Turned Into A Gift Raůl Gonzŕlez, a street-smart kid from Brooklyn and Puerto Rico, got a second chance in life when he found God and renounced drugs. He spent the rest of his life trying to pass that gift on to others. He founded Youth Challenge, which runs separate programs for men and women in Hartford that provide counseling, religion and job training. Gonzŕlez died recently of complications from liver problems. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: October 11, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/faithcommunity/htfd_courant_101109_1.asp

A Famous Tree That Spread Roots Into The Future The Charter Oak, Connecticut's legendary white oak tree that in 1687 hid the 1662 state charter from British officials, was toppled by a windstorm at 12:50 a.m. on Aug. 21, 1856. It stood near Charter Oak Place. Even before it fell, people collected acorns from the Charter Oak, nurtured them and planted trees in public places and on private property. State tree experts have documented a few authentic descendants. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: March 21, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/History/htfd_courant_032107.asp

A Farewell Of Note More than 1,000 family, friends, students and musicians said goodbye to Jackie McLean in song and prayer recently at the famed Abyssinian Baptist Church in Harlem, where he received his first saxophone as a boy. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: April 8, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/artsandculture/htfd_courant_040806.asp

A Founding Family's Greek Revival Landmark The Jonathan Goodwin Inn and Tavern stood near the corner of Albany Avenue and Irving Street in Hartford. The white-frame Greek Revival building was built in 1810 for Goodwin and his brother James Goodwin. The Goodwins were descendants of Ozias Goodwin, one of Hartford's founders. The tavern was one of three hotels on Albany Avenue, or the Albany-Hartford Road. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: June 6, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/History/htfd_courant_060607.asp

A Hartford Oasis Two Hartford eateries, Sully's Pub and Lena’s First and Last Pizzeria recently celebrated 25 year anniversaries. Published by The Hartford Advocate ; Publication Date: June 14, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/Neighborhoods/htfd_advocate_061407.asp

A Historic Sense Of Direction Scores of stone tablets inscribed with numerals and initials stand quiet sentinel along Connecticut's two-lane blacktops. Marking distances along roads that have served since Colonial days, many of these milestones are more than two centuries old. Some are obscured by brush and detritus, but many more — though rarely noticed — are clearly visible to thousands of motorists who pass them each day. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: April 11, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_041110.asp

A Historical Organization Changes With The Times The Antiquarian & Landmarks Society has changed its name. The archaic name caused a lot of confusion about the organization's purpose. To end the confusion, the 72-year-old society voted last fall to change its name: it is now known simply as Connecticut Landmarks. The new name better represents the organization's relevance and goal of exploring Connecticut history in new ways. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: April 18, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/artsandculture/htfd_courant_041808_1.asp

A Home To Be Proud Of Since the late 1980s, Mutual Housing Association of Greater Hartford has turned vacant buildings into beautiful, affordable homes whose residents form an association similar to a cooperative. Now, the group has a new home of its own. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: March 12, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/Housing/htfd_courant_031206.asp

A Humble Man Who 'Loved His Country' Lemuel Rodney Custis, a member of the famed Tuskegee Airmen and Hartford's first black police officer, was remembered at his funeral as a combat hero and a humble man who advanced the integration of the U.S. armed forces. Custis, 89, believed to have been the last member of the first class of black aviators to train at Tuskegee Institute, was buried with military honors at Cedar Hill Cemetery in Hartford. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: March 6, 2005
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_030605.asp

A Jewel in Need of Polishing A task force from the Trust For Public Land (TPL) recently released the results of its year-long study of Hartford’s parks. According to the report, although Hartford still has “an impressive quantity of parkland in relation to its size and population, decades of deferred maintenance has diminished the quality of park landscapes and buildings to the point that this multi-million dollar resource is at severe risk.” Published by The Hartford News ; Publication Date: December 19, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/parks/htfd_news_121907.asp

A Landmark Gets Its Due Recently, the weight of Samuel Colt’s legacy was officially acknowledged. A committee of preservation experts, architects and historians who advise the National Park Service voted to recommend the district of Coltsville as a National Historic Landmark. It is the highest honor the federal government bestows on properties of historic and architectural significance. It means that the 100-plus acres of Colt-related sites are closer to joining the company of the Grand Canyon, Valley Forge and Ellis Island as a National Park. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: December 09, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_120907.asp

A Landmark Stand: The Man Who Saved The Old State House Morrison H. Beach, former chairman and chief executive of the Travelers Insurance Co., died on Dec. 5. His leadership, epitomized by his single vote against the demolition of the Old State House, was a stunning example of how Hartford's corporate leaders can make a critical difference. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: December 17, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/History/htfd_courant_121706.asp

A Leader For The Hartford And The Red Cross Roland H. Lange's talents helped him excel in two very different fields. His rapport with people made him a natural in the business world, and he became the president and vice chairman of the board of the insurance company now known as The Hartford. His business skills helped him become a national leader in the American Red Cross, where he helped raise millions of dollars. Lange, a longtime resident of West Hartford, died on April 29, 2013. He was 102. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: July 28, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_072813.asp

A Life Devoted To History Bruce Fraser, 63, of Middletown, known as much for his sharp wit and command of state history as for his tireless work with the Connecticut Humanities Council, died Sunday, June 13, 2010 of cancer. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: June 15, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_061510.asp

A Lifetime Neck-Deep in Politics Ella Little Cromwell, now in her 80s, recently attended a celebration in her honor. Cromwell served on the Democratic town committee for 26 years and still holds a seat on the Democratic State Central Committee. She is perhaps best known for mentoring youngsters with political aspirations. She has always been a stickler about voter registration and participation in city politics and the NAACP. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: February 13, 2005
Document Link: /issues/documents/neighborhoods/htfd_courant_021305.asp

A Loss That Hurts Hartford The city is urged to do more to preserve historic structures, like the Connecticut Light and Power building that has been razed to put up a parking lot. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: June 26, 2005
Document Link: /issues/documents/downtowndevelopment/htfd_courant_062605.asp

A Lost Connection Wilson Faude expresses the opinion that Constitution Plaza is often the example used for failed urban renewal in Hartford. The critique ought to come with a caveat; If Constitution Plaza had been built as it was originally planned, it would have been an example of successful urban renewal. It would have worked. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: July 22, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/History/htfd_courant_072207.asp

A Man of Strong Opinions… Wilson “ Bill” Faude We at Hartford Publications have known Bill Faude for over 30 years, first in his capacity as the Executive Director of Hartford's - Connecticut's - Old State House, and then as a kind-of-man about town. In particular, a kind of a Hartford institution in his own right. With the World War II generation rapidly leaving us, few in the city, or the state, seem to know (or care) about the living history of our city and state. Bill does, and lives it. Published by The Hartford News ; Publication Date: August 29, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_news_082913.asp

A Man of Vision, Flair & Magic The Hartford Stage during the Fall of 2007 offered David Grimm's "Chick, the Great Osram," the story of Everett "Chick" Austin, the charismatic, flamboyant director of the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art, who reigned from 1927 to 1944. Austin, with his enthusiastic embrace of classic and modern tastes, turned the museum into a progressive presence in the international art world. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: October 14, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/artsandculture/htfd_courant_101407_2.asp

A New Historic Name Truth be told, we liked the old name. Antiquarian & Landmarks Society sounded cultured, scholarly, full of New England reserve. The problem was that people couldn't figure out what the heck it did. So as of Nov. 1, 2007, after 71 years, the society changed the name to Connecticut Landmarks. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: November 09, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_110907.asp

A Nostalgic Trip Back To The North End's Old Neighborhood “Remembering The Old Neighborhood," a compilation of memories and photos of Hartford’s North End from more than 150 former and current residents captures a time long gone and a place now greatly changed. Its recollections span life during the Great Depression, World War II and the post-war boom. A project of the Jewish Historical Society of Greater Hartford, edited by Joan Walden of West Hartford and designed by Cheryl Dauphin of Wethersfield, the book focuses on the Jewish experience of that time and place. But it also offers reminiscences from Italian, Irish and African American residents of the North End. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: July 19, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_071909.asp

A Park With Friends Like most urban parks across the nation, Pope Park fell on hard times in recent decades. Happily, The Friends of Pope Park, a nonprofit board (which happens to include Pope's great-grandson, Albert Pope III) has worked as industriously as the good colonel himself and recently unveiled the completion of the first phase of a comprehensive master plan to restore to its former glory this public resource. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: August 6, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/Parks/htfd_courant_080606.asp

A Part to Play: Hartford Conservatory Should Have A Place In City's Cultural Future In this op-ed, the author discusses the history of the Hartford Conservatory, and its future. She suggests that to root for the city of Hartford is to root for the arts; the post-industrial city will be an arts center if it will be anything. There ought to be a role for the conservatory in Hartford. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: June 25, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/education/htfd_courant_062506.asp

A Passion For Urban Planning, And For Food Terry Tondro was a law school professor, but no ivory tower academic; he enjoyed the finest in wines and foods, but preferred to cook dinner himself. He loved cities — he was truly an urbanist, but he relished the air and the ocean of rural Maine. He knew opera well, but enjoyed Ella Fitzgerald. He worked to preserve historic buildings, and also helped create housing available for low income families and people of color. Tondro, a Hartford resident, died of a stroke on April 26, 2012, two weeks shy of his 74th birthday. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: May 18, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_051812.asp

A Pied Piper Of Children's Stories Librarian Spencer Shaw, the first African-American librarian at the Hartford Public Library and in the US, became a pioneer in storytelling and collecting folk tales. He died recently at the age of 93. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: July 18, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_071810.asp

A Place Of Many Sacraments In this commentary, Mark Winne suggests that gardening, especially community gardening, creates neighborhoods, roots, revival and renewal. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: April 23, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/neighborhoods/htfd_courant_042306.asp

A Poet's Legacy: The Wallace Stevens Walk Among Hartford's literary luminaries over the past two centuries, Wallace Stevens is right there. Stevens is the poet some Connecticut people have heard of but never read. Stevens won a Pulitzer Prize, National Book awards and many other honors. the Hartford Friends and Enemies of Wallace Stevens HAVE created the Wallace Stevens Walk, which follows the route Stevens took every day from his home at 118 Westerly Terrace in Hartford's west end to his office at the Hartford Accident & Indemnity Co. building, Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: September 30, 2011
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_093011.asp

A Raconteur Who Became A Gay Activist John Barlow was a man about town of modest means. He seemed to be at every art opening, every concert, every lecture. He had a host of friends, and was a conversationalist par excellence. He also was a gay activist, a calling he could not even have imagined as a youth or young man. Barlow, 77, of Hartford, died on June 27, 2011. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: February 18, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_021812.asp

A Regional Citizen This Courant editorial celebrates the life of Latham Lee Allison, who died in August 14, 2008 at the age of 74. Mr. Allison, known as Lee, seemed to be wherever people were doing worthwhile things. His gentle and self-effacing manner masked a highly analytical mind, Mr. Allison was a corporate executive who voluntarily retired in his 50s to focus on community service work. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: August 20, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_082008.asp

A Scouting Life Natalie Phillips, an 88-year-old Hartford resident who's been involved in Scouting for more than 80 years, is just thrilled she survived until the Girl Scouts of the USA's 100th anniversary which occurred recently. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: March 13, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_031312.asp

A Shared Prospect Joe Namnoun says he "chased" the house for 20 years. Built in 1980 by renowned architect Robert A.M. Stern, it stands amid historic mansions on Prospect Avenue in Hartford — the result of the rare subdividing of an estate there and possibly the only building lot to become available along that stretch of Prospect in a century. In 2005, he and his partner, interior designer Marianne Donahue, finally were able to turn their longtime dream into reality and make it their own. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: March 26, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/neighborhoods/htfd_courant_032610.asp

A Shepherd For Memories Ethel Bacon, semi-retired archivist at the University of Hartford, has seen the private university grow from the merger 50 years ago of the Hartt College of Music with Hillyer College and the Hartford Art School. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: February 21, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/Education/htfd_courant_022107_a.asp

A Small Church In A Small Neighborhood Has A Big Heart Grace Episcopal Church is swimming upstream — but then, that's not new for the scrappy little church in Hartford's Parkville neighborhood. The neighborhood, one of the capital's smallest, is home to cultural anchors like Real Art Ways, as well as restaurants and bakeries that offer food found in Portugal, Vietnam, the Caribbean, South America and Africa. The neighborhood had a history of diversity before diversity was a buzzword Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: March 05, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/faithcommunity/htfd_courant_030508.asp

A Storied Autobiography From Mark Twain It is a 736-page treasure trove for scholars, years in the making and replete with footnotes, vintage photos and a detailed introduction that explains just how complex was the process of creating this book. But you don't have to be an academic to appreciate "The Autobiography of Mark Twain, Vol. I," which was published Nov. 15, 2010. Blending personal adventures, political opinions, nostalgia for bygone times and beloved family and friends — and, most of all, Twain's inimitable humor — it is both historically valuable and remarkably fresh. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: October 10, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_101010.asp

A Surefire Draw "Samuel Colt: Arms, Art and Invention," which opened recently at the Wadsworth Atheneum recently, shows off the brilliance of the local industrialist who personified Yankee ingenuity to the rest of the world. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: September 22, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/History/htfd_courant_092206.asp

A Tale Of Two Churches Hartford celebrated a milestone that shouldn't pass unnoticed: the 50th anniversary of the merging of two historic downtown Catholic churches, St. Anthony and St. Patrick. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: October 30, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/faithcommunity/htfd_courant_103008.asp

A Touch of Class As Hartford stands at the brink of a hotel-building boom, with the Hilton Hartford (formerly the Sheraton Hartford) opening after a $25 million makeover, and the new $81 million Marriott Hartford Downtown opening in soon it seems timely to recall Hartford's grand hotels of yesteryear. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: January 23, 2005
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_012305.asp Related Link(s): 2 Hotels, Restaurant Planned ; Cranes & Scaffolds: December '04 Progress Report on Hartford's Development Projects (PDF File)

A Tragedy, And Now A Triumph The names of Mary O'Neil, Mackenzie Murphy and Lisa Pinatti sound like those of the young immigrant women who could have worked at the Triangle Shirtwaist factory at the time of its tragic fire in 1911. But they are seventh-graders who made it to the Connecticut History Day competition in Hartford recently with their documentary about the horrific fire that changed New York City's fire code and the insensitivity toward female garment workers for all time. Mary, Mackenzie and Lisa took first place in the group documentary category for middle schools. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: April 29, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/History/htfd_courant_042907.asp

A Tribute To City Pioneer In Arts Everett "Chick" Austin, the charismatic arts visionary who transformed the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art and Hartford in the '20s '30s and '40s into a major force in modernism, is back. One of the city's most influential and dynamic figures is the subject of a new play by David Grimm, "The Great Osram." Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: October 23, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/artsandculture/htfd_courant_102306.asp

A Tribute To Suffragist Isabella Beecher Hooker Hartford was recently represented at the Democratic National Convention, where the 88th anniversary of women earning the right to vote was August 26, 2008. Isabella Beecher Hooker of Hartford, who along with Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton, worked to get the vote for women. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: August 25, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_082508.asp

A Visionary Preacher With A Name That Endures Horace Bushnell was among the most controversial and well-loved ministers of his day. His anti-Calvinistic belief in a spiritual and forgiving God nearly got him tried for heresy by fellow ministers, but it also influenced American theological thinking. And because of him, Hartford undertook one of the first urban renewal projects in the country - America's first public park financed by public funds, Bushnell Park. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: January 31, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/History/htfd_courant_013107.asp

A Visionary, A Politician - And, Briefly, A Baseball Pioneer Morgan Gardner Bulkeley was among Connecticut's most influential business, civic and political figures in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. A bridge that spans the Connecticut River is named for him. He also had a brief connection to baseball: He was the first president of the National League. He is in the National Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, NY. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: September 12, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_091207.asp

A Walk With History A brisk tour of Bushnell Park in Hartford reveals its key shapers, trees, and a buried river. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: June 15, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/Parks/htfd_courant_061507.asp

A Way Through the Park The Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Arch, believed to be the first permanent triumphal arch in the country, is one of Hartford's great historical treasures. However, many car accidents have repeatedly damaged the arch. A new plan, spearheaded by Linda Osten, would protect the arch while keeping Trinity Street open. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: November 13, 2005
Document Link: /issues/documents/downtowndevelopment/htfd_courant_111305.asp

A Wreath for Emmett Till: One Book One Hartford The images of Emmett Till’s unrecognizable, horribly brutalized body have not been locked out of public view since his murder in 1955. One Book One Hartford is reading and discussion of “A Wreath for Emmet Till” by Marilyn Nelson. At the Hartford Public Library memorabilia and documents, photographs, and ephemera like political buttons and magazines, are on display documenting the life and death of Emmett Till, and the larger context the Civil Rights Movement’s story. There are, however, pieces missing from an otherwise extensive exhibit displayed as part of One Book One Hartford. Originally, a photo of the deceased Till was installed on the third floor of the downtown library’s exhibit, but was later removed after the Hartford History Center’s curator found it and other images inappropriate because there was no explanation provided for them. Published by Real Hartford ; Publication Date: October 18, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/education/realhtfd_101812.asp

Abe Giles, Longtime Politician and Advocate For Hartford's Poor, Dies At 84 Abraham L. Giles, an eight-term state representative and North End power broker hailed by his supporters as a tireless advocate for the city's impoverished, died Saturday, March 26, 2011. He was 84. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: March 27, 2011
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_032711.asp

About That Lyric Theater Fund Helen Ubińas writes that Councilman Luis Cotto clearly forgot that he asked her to stay on him about his plan to start a fund to save the remaining portion of the old Lyric Theater. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: May 11, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/government/htfd_courant_051110.asp

Abraham Giles In Critical Condition, Family Says Former State Rep. Abraham Giles was admitted to St. Francis Hospital and Medical Center recently. Giles, 84, was in critical condition in the intensive care unit at St. Francis. Published by Hartford Cityline, The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: March 22, 2011
Document Link: /issues/documents/government/cityline_032211.asp

Abundance Of Bustle Dragon boats on the Connecticut River, snarling mini-cars near the state Capitol, the crack of croquet balls in the West End and history at the Old State House helped to fill Hartford with color and bustle recently. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: September 17, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/Parks/htfd_courant_091706.asp

Activist Known As Minister Out On The Street Carl Dudley was an activist, an organizer and a maverick always ready to try to make a difference in his community. He died on April 22, 2009 Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: May 24, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/faithcommunity/htfd_courant_052409_1.asp

Admired Hartford Officer Donald Healey Leaving Force Hartford Police Officer Donald Healey, 72, retired recently after 50 years with the Hartford Police Department. He is believed by Hartford officials to be the longest-serving police officer in the nation. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: November 23, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/crime/htfd_courant_112307.asp

Age-Old Lessons From Young Guides At Ancient Burying Ground On a recent weekday afternoon, four students dressed in matching white T-shirts congregate around the statue of Samuel Stone on the side of Center Church in downtown Hartford. The students spend their afternoons giving 25-minute tours of Hartford's oldest surviving landmark, revealing much of the city's deep-rooted past. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: July 16, 2011
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_071611.asp

Ailing Old State House Object Of Two Rescues Gov. M. Jodi Rell recently announced a $600,000 plan to give the financially troubled Old State House a one-year reprieve while a working group ponders its future. But legislative leaders announced a $2.2 million commitment of their own to take over the landmark building entirely. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: April 12, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/artsandculture/htfd_courant_041207.asp

Amid Conversion, History Pops Out For years, the American Airlines building in Hartford - across from Sage-Allen and The Richardson - stood as a monument to the drab façade makeovers of the 1970s, all brown brick and aluminum panels. But now, as 915 Main St. is being converted into condominiums, the developer is unearthing pieces of the structure's art deco architectural past behind those bland-looking panels. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: July 11, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/downtowndevelopment/htfd_courant_071106.asp

Amistad Exhibit Marks Emancipation Anniversary "Emancipation!," a new exhibit at Amistad Center for Arts & Culture in Hartford is on display to coincide with the 150th anniversary of the proclamation that freed all slaves in Confederate territory — has a lot of the images one would expect in an exhibit of this sort, such as prints of Lincoln and his cabinet, Frederick Douglass writings, abolitionist newspapers. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: June 04, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_060413.asp

Angels Restore Hartford's George Washington Painting School carpenters were awaiting the arrival of the father of our country on recently at Hartford Public High School, and talk turned to hardware. After years of collecting donations and calling in favors, alumni alliances and anonymous donors, a historic painting of George Washington had been painstakingly restored, and was set to return to one of the country's oldest high schools to occupy a place of honor in the Lewis Fox Memorial Library Media Center. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: May 04, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/artsandculture/htfd_courant_050412.asp

Anger After King's Death Left Lasting Mark On Hartford's North End On the night of Thursday, April 4, 1968, more than 150 people — most of them young, most of them black men — learned that the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. was dead, felled by an assassin's bullet. They left their homes, frustrated and fearful, and made their way through the North End of Hartford, burning some white-owned stores and looting many more as they went. Later that day, civic and religious leaders took to the city's streets from Clay-Arsenal to Upper Albany to Northeast, working to ease tensions. But, the riot changed the landscape of the Clay-Arsenal neighborhood and left scars still visible today. The riots exacerbated trends that were already in motion — businesses closed and never reopened, the white middle class fled and investment stalled in the North End neighborhood that is in sight, but out of reach, of downtown's wealth. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: April 06, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_040608.asp

Another Pointless Loss A developer now proposes to demolish the building at the corner of Wethersfield Avenue and Airport Road, and the three residential buildings immediately to its south, to build a small suburban-style strip mall anchored by a CVS Pharmacy. The building was the legendary Pippie's Italian Restaurant from 1959 to 1983, then it became Carmichael's. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: September 18, 2005
Document Link: /issues/documents/ArtsandCulture/htfd_courant_091805.asp

April 20: Tribute To Composer Jack Elliott At Hartt A major Hollywood composer and arranger for many decades, Jack Elliott, a one-time child prodigy who was born in Hartford and grew up in West Hartford, wrote scores for hit TV shows, died in Aug 2001 He was recently honored at his alma mater, The Hartt School at the University of Hartford. The school recently celebrated a donation made by the Elliott family of the composer/arranger's priceless private collection of 350 commissioned compositions and arrangements by nearly 100 contemporary American composers. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: April 15, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_041512.asp

Architectural Gem In Downtown Hartford Office Market Going To Auction An architectural gem near Hartford’s Union Station is going on the auction block soon, following a lengthy foreclosure. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: October 18, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/downtowndevelopment/htfd_courant_101812.asp

Architectural Gems: Where To See Hartford's Memorable Buildings, Graveyards Or Neighborhoods The Hartford Preservation Alliance has been contracted by the state Commission on Culture and Tourism to update a historic buildings survey from 1997. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: July 6, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/Neighborhoods/htfd_courant_070607.asp

Arthur C. Banks Jr. Dies At 91 Arthur C. Banks Jr. of Wethersfield, founding president and president emeritus of Greater Hartford Community College, now Capital Community College, died July 1, 2007 at Hartford Hospital. He was 91. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: July 7, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/History/htfd_courant_070707.asp

Artist Richard Welling Dies At 83; Pen-And-Ink Drawings Captured Hartford's Essence For more than 40 years, Richard Welling captured Hartford in his pen-and-ink line drawings, telling the city's story with every stroke. Described by some as a unique freehand artist with an eye for detail, Welling, who lived in Hartford, died of cancer at age 83 recently, leaving behind a body of work with historical significance. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: November 12, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/artsandculture/htfd_courant_111209.asp

Artist, Educator Alan Tompkins, prolific artist, educator and a key figure in forming the University of Hartford, has died. He was 100. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: December 07, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/artsandculture/htfd_courant_120707.asp

Artists Canoe Underground To Explore Buried Park River In Hartford A concrete crypt snaking beneath the city of Hartford is irresistible art for Joe McCarthy and Peter Albano. So is the prospect of bringing new life to the largely forgotten and very buried Park River that flows far beneath Hartford, sealed in cement, before it dumps into the Connecticut. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: July 29, 2011
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_072911.asp

Arts As Essential, Not An Option Arts and culture are often viewed as ornaments, not as essentials of public life in Connecticut. The importance of art was raised In a discussion titled "Arts & Heritage: Climbing to the Top of the Urban Agenda," sponsored by the MetLife Foundation, part of the Arts and Business Council of Americans for the Arts' National Arts Forum Series held recently at the Mark Twain house . Some of the presentations focused on an historical overview of Hartford and the role of art and architecture in civic life, but much of it focused on economic realities. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: September 28, 2005
Document Link: /issues/documents/artsandculture/htfd_courant_092805.asp

As National Park, Coltsville Would Bloom Tom Condon supports the creation of national park status for Coltsville because it would expedite the redevelopment — the adaptive reuse — of the complex. IIf the restoration project is completed, there would be a mixed-use community there with 500-600 jobs and 500 residents. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: June 18, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_061810.asp

At Hartford's Bulkeley High School, A Push To Preserve The Past Morgan Gardner Bulkeley was the city's mayor, the state's governor, a U.S. senator and president of Aetna before his death in 1922. Bulkeley High School opened four years later in Hartford's South End. A committee of Bulkeley staff and alumni plans to raise $60,000 this year to establish the Morgan Gardner Bulkeley Historical Center on the school's second floor, which will feature a portrait and history of the man, a wall of display cases for trophies and memorabilia, a conference table for meetings and the school crest printed on the hardwood floor. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: February 06, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/education/htfd_courant_020613.asp

At Hartford's University High School, Students Writing History — Literally At the University High School of Science and Engineering, students in Theresa Vara-Dannen's American Studies class have researched and written about figures, and others, from Hartford's past — their work has become part of the historical record. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: January 04, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/education/htfd_courant_010413.asp

Atheneum Landscapes Captivate The Wadsworth Atheneum's exhibit of its Hudson River School masterworks, titled "American Splendor," has wide appeal. The magnificent paintings depict the grandeur of the capitol region's physical history, but they testify to the often underappreciated cultural wealth that exists in Hartford. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: June 5, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/artsandculture/htfd_courant_060506.asp

Automobile Dealers Prepare For Centennial Celebration On May 15, 2008, representatives of Papa's Dodge and Mitchell Auto Group and other central Connecticut dealers attended the centennial celebration of the Greater Hartford Automobile Dealers Association at the Bushnell Center for the Performing Arts. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: May 08, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_050808.asp

Back From the Abyss Richard T. Mulready long has worked in managing commercial real estate. Today, Mulready is preparing to hand off his operations to a younger generation of real estate go-getters. Published by The Hartford Business Journal ; Publication Date: August 15, 2011
Document Link: /issues/documents/downtowndevelopment/hbj_081511.asp

Back To Old Neighborhoods Leonard Tulin hadn't been to his old neighborhood in Hartford's North End for decades. But, he recently returned for a visit at the urging of his nephew, David Kravet. The trip, which included visits to his former high school, Keney Park and the family burial plot, was an important one, not only for Tulin, but for the entire family. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: December 2, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/History/htfd_courant_120206.asp

Bank Of America Move Will Empty A Financial Cornerstone Of Hartford The long tradition of banking on the corner of Main and Pearl streets in Hartford is now coming to an end, as Bank of America — a far-removed successor bank to Hartford National — prepares to move from 777 Main St. to CityPlace, a block away on Asylum Street. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: April 16, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/downtowndevelopment/htfd_courant_041610.asp

Baronet Coffee Still Growing Amid Competition Like his father and grandfather before him, Bruce Goldsmith, president of Baronet Coffee Inc., knows his company can't be content to sit still. The 78-year-old coffee roasting and supply company in Hartford has had to constantly reinvent itself to remain competitive, Goldsmith said. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: May 14, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/economicdevelopment/htfd_courant_051408.asp

Base Ball Goes Back In Time Coltsville Vintage Base Ball League will begin its inaugural season of play in the Colt Meadows this spring. The league will be made up of four teams named after those that actually played in Hartford in the 1860s. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: February 13, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_021310.asp

Battle Over Historic Structure Not much except routine permits stands between The Hartford and its plans to demolish all but the oldest portion of the former MassMutual building on Asylum Hill. But there is still a flicker of opposition that won't be snuffed out: those who want to see a greater part, or even all the historic building in Hartford preserved. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: April 29, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/neighborhoods/htfd_courant_042908_1.asp

Beatrice Fox Auerbach Used Wealth To Care Beatrice Fox Auerbach, who headed the G. Fox department store beginning in 1938 continued the tradition of giving back to the community. She instituted an in-store hospital, retirement benefits, paid vacations, employee loans, scholarships and inexpensive meals in the cafeteria. It would be hard to find a philanthropy that didn't have Auerbach's hand in it, and when she died in 1968, The Courant said she left the community richer for her having been here, and poorer now that she was gone. Her store would pass away, but her philanthropy lives. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: January 01, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_010112.asp

Belated Award In Fight For Fair Play Syracuse University Chancellor Nancy Cantor recently presented the so-called Syracuse Eight with the Chancellor's Medal for extraordinary courage. Black football players boycotted the season to protest racial inequities within the school's athletic department. John Lobon of Hartford was one of them. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: October 21, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_102106.asp

Benjamin Laury Sr. Dies Benjamin Laury was among the first six black men to become full-time Hartford firefighter in 1948. He died at the end of March 2010 at age 87, the last surviving member of the five men in that group who spent at least 25 years with the department. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: March 29, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_032910.asp

Big H Business Profile: The Tobacco Shop The Tobacco Shop, established in 1920, is Connecticut's leading pipe and cigar store. They specialize in pipes and pipe tobacco, offering the finest pipes. Published by The Hartford News ; Publication Date: July 18, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/downtowndevelopment/htfd_news_071813_2.asp

Biked, Walked, and Discovered in 2010 The recent Discover Hartford Bicycling and Walking Tour was an “anti-sprawl, pro-fun, pro-sustainable city, anti-pollution, anti-couch potato, pro-bicycle pro-pedestrian event” meant to show off all the great places within the city of Hartford. Published by Real Hartford ; Publication Date: September 12, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/parks/realhtfd_091210.asp

Billy Kearns, A Cops Cop, Dies At 86 Billy Kearns was "a cop's cop." That's how a former police chief described him when he retired from the Hartford Police Department in 1984. William Kearns, who spent 32 years with the city department, died Sunday, February 3, 2013 in East Hartford. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: February 08, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_020813.asp

Black Governors Ball Saturday The John E. Rogers African American Cultural Center and the Black Governors’ Committee held its 2007 Black Governors’ Ball on Saturday, April 28, at the Artists Collective. A procession of 15 outstanding community leaders depicting the historical Black Governors elected in Connecticut from 1749-1856 was led by the 2005 Black Governor, Eric Crawford of Hartford. Consistent with the tradition established in the 2004 and 2005 Black Governors’ Balls, gala attendees wore period dress and contemporary formal attire. Published by The Hartford News ; Publication Date: April 25 - May 2, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/Neighborhoods/htfd_news_042507.asp

Blue Hills Church of God: The Vision Realized The Blue Hills New Testament Church of God, Hartford, Connecticut, U. S. A., has over 40 Years of Service in the City of Hartford. Founded by the late Reverend Dr. Peter Constantine Barrett in 1965, it holds the distinction of being the first Church of God in Hartford. It recently moved to a new, larger building and celebrated and dedicated the building at the end of October 2009. Published by Northend Agent's ; Publication Date: October 21, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/faithcommunity/northend_agents_102109.asp

Blumenthal Seeks Colt Action Attorney General Richard Blumenthal recently asked the National Parks Service to reconsider a recommendation denying historic landmark status to the Colt Gateway complex in Hartford. He joined the chorus of politicians to speak against the decision. The decision, which can be appealed, now goes to the park service's advisory board, which will consider it and send a recommendation to the secretary of the interior. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: October 18, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_101806.asp

Boat Building Recognized as Historic The Hartford headquarters of The Phoenix Companies Inc., affectionately known as the "boat building," has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: February 9, 2005
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_020905.asp

Book Profiles The Mysterious Woman In Mark Twain's Life There are a lot of reasons why Laura Skandera Trombley spent 16 years working on a book about a woman whom generations of Mark Twain biographers dismissed as inconsequential to his life. But the biggest catalyst was the 450-page elephant in the room: a manuscript Twain wrote in his final years savaging the reputation of his former personal assistant, Isabel Van Kleek Lyon. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: March 21, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_032110.asp

Book Review: My Hartford of the Nineteenth Century by Helen Post Chapman This book, copyright date of 1928, is the definition of quaint. I happened across this at the library while looking for information on Hartford’s Dutch roots. The purpose of this book is nothing more than a place for the author to reminisce about “what old Hartford used to be.” It was inspired by letters sent to the Hartford Times. Published by Real Hartford ; Publication Date: November 17, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/realhtfd_111709.asp

Book To Celebrate City's West Indians Members of the West Indian Foundation, the West Indian Social Club and other organizations plan to chronicle the history of Hartford's West Indian community through the publication of a book titled "West Indian-Americans in Greater Hartford: Images of the Past 1920 to 1970." Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: February 21, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/Neighborhoods/htfd_courant_022106.asp

Botanical Garden Plan To Be Discussed The Hartford Botanical Garden Committee is planning a public meeting to discuss the creation of a botanical garden in Colt Park. Formed in 1998, the committee's mission is to create a 21st century garden that celebrates the landscape, architecture and history of the city's parks. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: May 25, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/parks/htfd_courant_052506.asp

Boxing Fundraiser for Johnny Duke Memorial Former IBF Light heavyweight world title challenger John "Iceman" Scully participated in a twelve bout amateur boxing show on Friday, December 5, 2008 at the brand new Lion's Den Gym in Middletown. The event will raise funds to purchase a Memorial Plaque for longtime Hartford trainer and National Golden Gloves Hall of Fame member Johnny Duke, who passed at age 83 away in 2006. Published by The Hartford News ; Publication Date: November 13, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/neighborhoods/htfd_news_111308.asp

Breakthrough Seen In Preservation Rules Work on a new historic preservation ordinance has been at an impasse - stymied by needing to find a way to balance the need for preservation with the need to protect low-income homeowners from undue repair expenses. Preservationists redrafted the ordinance and have resubmitted it to the mayor's office for review with one major substantive change that addresses the cost of home repairs. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: April 7, 2005
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_040705.asp Related Link(s): Task Force Ideas Fizzle

Bridge Dedicated To Late City Mayor While in office from 1993 to 2001, Mayor Mike Peters built bridges among the city, state and community. So it was fitting that the new 270-foot bridge linking the Connecticut Convention Center to the Connecticut Science Center was dedicated Tuesday as "Mayor Mike Peters Bridge." Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: July 26, 2011
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_072611.asp

Bridgeport Is Worse Off Than Stockton Stockton is one of California's larger cities. Nearly a year ago, its city council voted to file for bankruptcy. This is the largest municipal bankruptcy filing in the nation's history. Bridgeport, however, is in worse financial condition that Stockton when you consider off-balance-sheet obligations. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: May 17, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/region/htfd_courant_051713.asp

Bring Back the Isle of Safety This Hartford Courant opinion describes the history of and offers compelling reasons to restore the Isle of Safety and return it to its original place of prominence. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: February 27, 2005
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_022705.asp

Bringing A Beautiful Bridge To Light One hundred and forty thousand drivers cross the Connecticut River on I-84 to Hartford every day, unaware that the magnificent but unseen structure beneath them holds a coveted spot on the National Register of Historic Places and turns 100 this month. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: October 18, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/transportation/htfd_courant_101808.asp

Bringing The North End Back Into Downtown When the city's plan to incorporate the facade of the historic Second North District School on High Street into the new public safety complex fell through, all too literally, no one was angrier and more upset than Bill Hosley. Hosley used to run the Antiquarian & Landmarks Society, now called Connecticut Landmarks, which owns the lovely Isham-Terry House just down the street from the 19th-century brick school building. He came to see that the North End was, he said, Hartford's Lower East Side, an area that had been home to many immigrant groups and had "so much history." Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: August 22, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_082210.asp

Bruce Fraser : A Champion Of History Bruce Fraser knew that history is not the study of the dead, but of the living, at an earlier point in time. It is about the great and the powerful, but also about the lives and hopes of ordinary people. Mr. Fraser, 63, executive director of the Connecticut Humanities Council since 1982, died Sunday, June 13 after battling cancer for nearly a year. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: June 16, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_061610.asp

Bulkeley High School's Class Of 1944 To Hold 65th And Final Reunion The Bulkeley High School Class of 1944 may have started out a little slow in the annual reunion department — but it's sure finishing strong. The reunion at Wampanoag Country Club in West Hartford held on Sunday, September 27, 2009 marked the 65th — and final — formal reunion for the group. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: September 26, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_092609.asp

Burial Ground Looking Up Spring Grove Cemetery is grand enough to hold the remains of poet Lydia Sigourney, artist Frederic Edwin Church and members of Hartford's illustrious families - Goodwin, Batterson, Loomis and others. And yet, Spring Grove is humble, too. Established at 2053 Main St. in 1845, Spring Grove had fallen into gross disrepair by the 1980s. In the late 1980s, manager Caleb O'Connor began the effort to restore the cemetery. The renovation continued under Albert F. Lennox, who was appointed manager of the cemetery in 2004. Last year, the Hartford Preservation Alliance gave Lennox and his volunteers an award for the restoration. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: February 12, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/History/htfd_courant_021206.asp

Burr Mall Re-Opening Celebration October 15 Over the past several months, the Ella Burr McManus Trust has completed a refurbishment of the Alfred E. Burr Memorial, adjacent to Hartford City Hall. This has included repainting the ‘Stegosaurus’ sculpture in its original Calder red, replacing all the pavers, trimming trees to allow views in from the street, and repairing the fountain. The Trustees invited all city residents, workers and visitors to come and see these improvements and enjoy their lunch hour on the Mall on October 15, 2008. Published by The Hartford News ; Publication Date: October 09, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/artsandculture/htfd_news_100908.asp

Bushnell Shifts Musical Gears Visiting orchestras and conductors of world-class quality are no longer on the Bushnell's schedule, yielding to a greater presence by local classical groups with an occasional guest artist. Bushnell administrators and trustees will tell you that Hartford's premier nonprofit performing arts venue is in a state of experimental flux in its classical music programming. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: July 16, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/artsandculture/htfd_courant_071606_b.asp

Business As Usual As Colt Reunites Military, Civilian Gun Manufacturing The two halves of the gun making company Samuel Colt established in Hartford in the 1850s are coming back together, with plans that include keeping a combined 750 employees in West Hartford, a company executive said recently. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: July 22, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_072213.asp

Buyers Vow To Restore Historic 36 Lewis St. The historic brick building at 36 Lewis St. in downtown Hartford -- site of an upscale restaurant in the 1980s and a controversial after-hours dance club in the 1990s -- has been purchased by a partnership of investors from Hartford and Newport, R.I. One of the Hartford investors said recently that the partnership plans to preserve and restore the Italianate-style exterior. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: January 13, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/downtowndevelopment/htfd_courant_011312.asp

California Developer Breathes New Life Into Troubled Colt Gateway A year ago, Lance Jay Robbins had never even set foot in Hartford. Now, the California developer has taken on the financially troubled Colt Gateway redevelopment project, a massive undertaking that has languished for two years. Robbins, a former real estate lawyer, hopes to finish the $120 million restoration of the former factory complex known for its blue onion dome after the last developer, Homes for America Holdings Inc., ran out of money. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: April 07, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/economicdevelopment/htfd_courant_040709.asp

Can't Let Main Street Languish Historical consultant William Hosley reminds downtown Hartford stakeholders that Main Street is an asset worthy of their attention. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: June 19, 2005
Document Link: /issues/documents/artsandculture/htfd_courant_061905.asp

Candid As Ever, The King Departs The Rev. King Thomas Hayes has an exalted vision of his retirement years. Let's just say it doesn't include a lot of late-night phone calls. Rev. Hayes retired April 1, 2007 from Shiloh Baptist Church in North Hartford after 31 years in the pulpit. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: March 31, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/FaithCommunity/htfd_courant_033107.asp

Carbone Recovering From Assault Three weeks after Hartford surgeons reconstructed his face, Nick Carbone was back in his sneakers walking through the park in the backyard of his high-rise apartment to where he was viciously attacked. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: June 25, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/crime/htfd_courant_062508.asp

Carlos Toro A Valiant Fighter For The Sick Carlos Toro was a scrappy fighter whose advocacy on behalf of people with AIDS helped hundreds of people around Hartford deal with disease and discrimination. He was the first to admit his flaws. He fought drug addiction most of his life and spent time in jail. His marriage dissolved when he realized he was gay. He died on February 22, 2010 at age 57. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: April 11, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/health/htfd_courant_041110.asp

Carol Walter: A Relentless Advocate For Poor, Homeless In Connecticut Carol Walter had developed a national profile in the drive to end homelessness — not by promoting larger shelters and bigger programs, but by returning people as quickly as possible to a home of their own. Walter died Dec. 27, 2012. At the time of her death, she was the executive director of the Connecticut Coalition to End Homelessness, based in Hartford. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: January 14, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/homelessness/htfd_courant_011413.asp

Carrying Carrier For Six Decades In Two Continents Small, family-owned dealerships like the one owned by Ugo DiGrazia are an essential part of Carrier, a $12 billion subsidiary of United Technologies Corp., and for DiGrazia, it's been a 6-decade career on two continents. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: February 08, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/immigrants/htfd_courant_020812.asp

Cedar Hill: A Cemetery And A Park In the 19th century, Americans began to see cemeteries as resting places not only for the dead, but also for the living. The rural cemetery movement saw the creation of peaceful, park-like burial places in which the living could takes walks or carriage rides, have picnics or meditate on life's mysteries. Hartford's Cedar Hill Cemetery, a 270-acre greensward that dates from 1863, is one of the finest examples of this bucolic genre. Cedar Hill has lakes, woods and wildlife, plus architecture and monuments by some of the best designers of the period. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: September 09, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/parks/htfd_courant_090910.asp

Celebrity Author And Hartford Native Dominick Dunne Dies At Age 83 Dominick Dunne, a celebrated chronicler of the crimes of the rich and famous and a best-selling novelist who skyrocketed to celebrity status through his vivid, caustic, openly partisan and dishy coverage of the infamous O.J. Simpson murder trial, died recently at his home in Manhattan. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: August 27, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_082709.asp

Cemetery Tours To Die For There are many odd and often fascinating things you can learn during a guided tour of Cedar Hill Cemetery. The tours are scheduled regularly, and the themes change. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: July 16, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_071610.asp

Center To Feature 1920s Time Capsule A 1920s time capsule extracted from a cornerstone recently will be displayed at the Morgan Gardner Bulkeley Historical Center when it formally opens next month. The project to transform a former book room at Bulkeley High School into a center honoring the institution's past received $10,000 recently from a 1963 graduate celebrating his 50th reunion this year. The gift funded several upgrades, including the school crest featured prominently on new flooring. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: August 10, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/education/htfd_courant_081013_1.asp

Cheap Summertime Thrills Kerri Provost provides some ideas for free, cheap, or cheaper than usual things to do in Hartford. Published by Real Hartford ; Publication Date: May 24, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/neighborhoods/realhtfd_052410.asp

Church To Honor Leader Of 19 Years It's been a long road, but after 19 years as the spiritual leader of Mount Olive Ministries, Bishop James L. Fenner Sr. is proud of his accomplishments and the people he serves. Recently, members of Mount Olive honored Fenner and his wife, Rosa, for their dedication to Mount Olive with a special worship service led by the Rev. David Massey from Hopewell Baptist Church in Windsor. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: April 8, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/faithcommunity/htfd_courant_040806.asp

Circus Fire Memorial To Be Dedicated A memorial for the 168 victims of the circus fire is dedicated, 61 years after the tragic event on the north end of Hartford. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: July 5, 2005
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_070505.asp

Circus Fire Scrapbook Project Kicks Off At Library Recently, Hartford Public Library joined The Mark Twain House & Museum in observing the anniversary of the Hartford Circus Fire, one of the most catastrophic civic tragedies in the city’s history, and one of the most thoroughly documented disasters in American circus history. Published by The Hartford News ; Publication Date: July 03, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_news_070313.asp

City of Hartford Historic Districts and Individual Historic Properties Map A map of local, state, and national historic districts and properties in Hartford as of March, 2007. (PDF document, 1 page) Published by City of Hartford, Planning Division, Department of Development Services ; Publication Date: March 2007
Document Link: /issues/wsd/History/historic_district_map.pdf

City Pays Tribute to Mayor Mike Recently, politicians, police officers, firefighters, community activists, state officials, governors, mayors, friends and family filled the St. Augustine Church in Hartford for the funeral of Mayor Mike Peters. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: January 09, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/government/htfd_courant_010909.asp

City Remembers Legendary Latina Leader, Maria Sanchez When the chips were down in the Hartford political game, there wasn't a tougher, shrewder player than the grandmotherly Maria Colon Sanchez. Those who underestimated her did so at their peril. When she didn't appear to be paying attention, she was counting votes. Ms. Sanchez, who died in 1989, used her political skills to advance her fellow Puerto Ricans and other Latinos who settled in Hartford. Recently, the city dedicated a street in her honor in the Clay-Arsenal neighborhood. It was there, from Maria's Newsstand, her tiny store, that she worked her magic. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: December 03, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_120308.asp

City Street Back On Map The small east-west strip between Main and Market streets, once named Theatre Street, was all but erased from the map to make way for the infamous "Mixmaster" - a structure that sheltered pedestrians moving between three shopping sites. But the Mixmaster has been razed, and Temple Street soon will reopen, bringing foot and car traffic back to a downtown corridor in need of flow. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: January 2, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/DowntownDevelopment/htfd_courant_010207.asp

City's Portuguese Mourn The Rev. Jose da Silva, the spiritual leader of Hartford's Portuguese community for half a century and the man who bound it together by expanding its church, died on December 7, 2006 in Portugal after a battle with cancer. He was 80. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: December 8, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/FaithCommunity/htfd_courant_120806.asp

City's Role In Amistad Overlooked The author of this opinion piece, a student at Capital Community College, recently visited the Old State House in Hartford on a field trip where he learned the truth about the role of Hartford in the Amistad trial. In addition, an exhibit there called "Want Change?" celebrates the lives of those who used state government to advance their causes. The field trip opened the door for the author’s class to explore state and local history in greater depth, and he encourages others to do the same. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: October 25, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/artsandculture/htfd_courant_102509_1.asp

City-State Plan For Preserving Old State House Advances The Hartford city council has approved leasing the Old State House to the state of Connecticut for 99 years, a key step in a plan that preservationists hope will guarantee the future of the historic structure. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: February 28, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_022808.asp

Coburn & Meredith Leaves Hartford For Simsbury, Glastonbury Sites After keeping shop at seven different locations in downtown Hartford over a span of 75 years, investment firm Coburn & Meredith is moving out of the city and into the suburbs, where the parking is free but walking-distance lunch spots are much more limited. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: November 03, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/downtowndevelopment/htfd_courant_110309.asp

Colleagues Remember Abraham Giles; Dead At 84 Abraham Giles was a Hartford politician and former state representative known for his personality and for his ability to survive in the game when others had long ago lost, or moved on. Giles died recently at the age of 84. Published by Capital Region Report, Jeff Cohen @ WNPR ; Publication Date: March 28, 2011
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/jcohen_032811.asp

Collective Memories At Amistad Center The historical collection at the Amistad Center for Art & Culture was begun by Randolph Linsley Simpson. One hundred fifty noteworthy pieces from the Amistad's inventory — which has grown from Simpson's artifacts to now number 6,000 items — are on exhibit now at the Hartford museum. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: May 13, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/artsandculture/htfd_courant_051312.asp

Colonial Witch Hysteria Recalled On May 26, 1647, a Windsor woman named Alse Young was hanged for witchcraft where Hartford's Old State House now stands. On Saturday, a group of descendants, historians and interested onlookers gathered down the road at Barnard Park - the South Green - to remember Young and 10 other Connecticut residents executed for witchcraft in Colonial Connecticut. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: May 27, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/History/htfd_courant_052707.asp

Colt Closing On Goal In this editorial, the Hartford Courant expresses the opinion that telling the complex story of Coltsville in a way that engages a diverse audience and does justice to its contributions in shaping U.S. history is both a challenge and an economic development opportunity that may never come this way again. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: August 03, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/parks/htfd_courant_080308.asp

Colt Complex Moves Closer To Landmark Status The path to landmark status for the Coltsville Historic District, the area anchored by the historic blue onion dome atop the Colt firearms complex, has taken years of effort by advocates and officials at Colt Gateway, LLC — the developers who are looking to convert the area into apartments and commercial space. The recent National Park Service Advisory Board action followed a positive recommendation last December by an advisory committee of the National Park Service. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: July 23, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_072308.asp

Colt Gateway A historic success after going through a series of developers, the vast area that comprises Colt Gateway is moving along well. With its mix of schools; Greater Hartford Academy of the Arts, Two River's High School and the River Street School, businesses like Foley Carrier in the South Armory and Insurity in the Saw Tooth building and its current 50 occupied apartments, there is lots of life in Coltsville. Published by The Hartford News ; Publication Date: August 29, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/economicdevelopment/htfd_news_082913.asp

Colt Gateway... A Promise Being Fulfilled Coltsville, in Hartford's South Meadows, has quite a history. In the mid-19th century, it was one of the nation’s largest and most advanced factories, turning out Samuel Colt’s famous six-shooter revolver by the thousands. Today, Connecticut’s congressional leaders are trying to turn the factory and its surroundings into a National Park. The first hurdles in this process have been completed, but others still remain. Colt Gateway (today's term for Coltsville) is a vibrant community with businesses, schools, occupied apartments, some home based business and a new restaurant, Cafe Colt. Published by The Hartford News ; Publication Date: March 07, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_news_030713.asp

Colt Legend And Legacy Indeed Worth Building On In this commentary, William Hosely suggests that while Samuel Colt was no hero by any definition, he wrestled with the momentous challenges of his day in a way most of us can hardly imagine. He was a person of astonishing imagination at one of the most transformative junctures in world history, the advent of industrialization. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: October 1, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/History/htfd_courant_100106_b.asp

Colt Moves to Clear the Air Colt Gateway Developer Robert MacFarlane says his property taxes are up to date and his entanglement with a bankrupt lender is resolved. Published by The Hartford Advocate ; Publication Date: January 10, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_advocate_011008.asp

Colt Needs a Kick Start The developer in charge of renovating the historic Colt complex in Hartford, says the project is in good shape despite some funding obstacles. He hopes that the state Department of Economic and Community Development will agree to release the balance of a $4.5 million remediation grant that has been pledged. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: March 16, 2005
Document Link: /issues/documents/downtowndevelopment/htfd_courant_031605.asp

Colt Project In Hartford Gets New Developer As momentum builds for designating the former Colt factory in Hartford a national park, the long-awaited redevelopment of the sprawling complex known for its blue-onion dome is getting another boost: a new developer and a major commercial lease. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: August 20, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/downtowndevelopment/htfd_courant_082010.asp

Colt Project on Hold Work has been stalled for months on Colt Gateway, the $160 million project at the center of an effort to gain National Historic Landmark status for the Colt complex. The developer says it's time for the state to step in with some money to get things moving again. Published by The Hartford Advocate ; Publication Date: September 20
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_advocate_092007.asp

Colt Show Called Off The Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art announced recently that after three years of research and planning, it was canceling the much-anticipated show, "Samuel Colt: Arms, Art, and Invention," because of lack of local funding. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: March 9, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/ArtsAndCulture/htfd_courant_030906.asp

Colt Story Begs To Be Told Patience is at a premium for those at the national, state and local levels who yearn to see the dreams of Coltsville realized, The Courant among them. The $110 million rehabilitation of the 19th-century arms factory complex in Hartford has been stalled at times as the developers juggle various funding sources. But the more vexing delays have been in its designation as a National Historic Landmark. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: August 26, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_082607.asp

Colt Story Worth Repeating Great stories attract visitors by the thousands and millions. Here in Hartford we are sitting on one of the greatest stories in the world. It's the story of Sam Colt and his amazing armories. Told well, these stories could triple or quadruple the number of visitors to Hartford. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: November 4, 2005
Document Link: /issues/documents/artsandculture/htfd_courant_110405.asp

Colt Tarnished? Only By Smears One of the objectives of "Samuel Colt: Arms, Art and Invention" is to dispel the myths and biases that have been trotted out on various occasions over the past decade. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: October 1, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/History/htfd_courant_100106.asp

Colt's Guns Just Can't Win In The East The funding challenge that forced the cancellation of "Samuel Colt: Arms, Art and Invention" at the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art is a sobering reminder of the politics of the Colt story. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: March 12, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/History/htfd_courant_031206.asp

Coltsville Clears Hurdle No area of Hartford has more history or economic development potential than Coltsville. So it's exciting that the former factory village and industrial crucible developed by entrepreneur and inventor Samuel Colt has passed muster for the second time in its bid to become a National Historic Landmark. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: July 24, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/downtowndevelopment/htfd_courant_072408.asp

Coltsville Deserves To Become A National Park Rick Green comments that Coltsville is our Grand Canyon, an Old Faithful in the Connecticut River Valley. It is our almost National Park in Hartford. It could also be another lost Hartford dream. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: December 04, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/education/htfd_courant_120409.asp

Coltsville Historic District Gains U.S. Designation The Coltsville Historic District in Hartford, where Samuel Colt made industrial history manufacturing firearms, has reached the end of its years-long quest to be included among the country's National Historic Landmarks. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: October 15, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_101508.asp

Coltsville Looking Like A Landmark Coltsville's place in Hartford history has long been secure. Under the blue onion dome occurred a revolution in firearms manufacturing that won the West and helped the Union triumph in the Civil War. With recent action by National Park Service officials, Coltsville moved closer to gaining a place on the national historic map, a step Connecticut officials hope will spur the long-awaited redevelopment of the one-time manufacturing village into a national park. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: December 06, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_120607.asp

Coltsville National Park Visitor Experience Study This study describes the Places, People, and Partners associated with the effort to create a National Park in the National Historic Landmark District in Hartford, Connecticut, known as Coltsville. (PDF document, 61 pages) Published by Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation ; Publication Date: December, 2008
Document Link: /issues/wsd/history/Coltsville_Visitor_Experience_Study.pdf

Coltsville Reload In this editorial, the Hartford Courant expresses the opinion that Members of the state's legislative delegation have revived a bill that would designate the renowned 19th-century factory village in South Hartford as a National Historical Park. A similar bill failed last year in the House. This year there are reasons to be somewhat more hopeful. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: July 25, 2011
Document Link: /issues/documents/parks/htfd_courant_072511.asp

Coltsville So Close To Becoming National Historic Park Coltsville, the brick buildings that made up the renowned 19th-century factory village in South Hartford, Is on the verge of becoming a National Historic Park, with the hope that prosperity it brought to Hartford in the 19th century will repeat in the 21st. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: September 29, 2011
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_092911.asp

Coltsville Special Resource Study, November 2009 The Coltsville Special Resource Study concludes in this report that the Coltsville Historic District NHL meets the criteria for national significance and suitability. Because of difficulty with accessing the interior and various ownership issues, the study team was unable to conclude that the historic district meets the criteria as a feasible addition to the National Park System. The study also was unable to to determine that a need for National Park Service management exists. (PDF document, 84 pages) Published by U.S. National Park Service ; Publication Date: November 2009
Document Link: /issues/wsd/history/final_coltsville_report.pdf

Coltsville Special Resource Study, Public Meeting Presentation, December 14, 2009 A public presentation by the National Park Service made on December 14, 2009, which describes the process of the Coltsville Special Resource Study, and which solicits public comment. (PDF document, 13 pages) Published by U.S. National Park Service ; Publication Date: December 14, 2009
Document Link: /issues/wsd/history/Coltsville_Spec_Resource_Study.pdf

Coltsville Struggles, But Still On Track In this editorial, the Hartford Courant expresses the opinion that the Coltsville industrial complex in Hartford's South Meadows is showing several positive signs for the restoration and mixed-use development of the complex. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: August 29, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_082910_1.asp

Coltsville Study A Road Map To National Park Status Although a newly released federal study concludes that the Coltsville Historic District does not qualify now to become a national park, supporters said recently it provides a road map to reach the goal. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: December 02, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/economicdevelopment/htfd_courant_120209.asp

Coltsville Suffers Setback In Bid To Be National Park The drive to designate the former Colt factory complex as a national park suffered what supporters called a minor setback recently when a bill that would have formally started the process failed in the U.S. House of Representatives. The bill, introduced in April 2010 by U.S. Rep. John B. Larson, would have established several criteria for the Coltsville industrial village to become a national park. A member of Larson's staff said that he intends to reintroduce the bill as soon as possible. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: September 23, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_092310.asp

Coltsville's Aim: Immortality This Courant editorial comments that a critical moment in state history will take place in October 2006, when a committee of the National Park Service decides whether to recommend that parts of Coltsville, including the onion-domed arms factory and 19th-century worker housing, be designated a National Historic Landmark. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: September 10, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/History/htfd_courant_091006.asp

Coltsville's Big Mo May Really Be Here When Sam Colt put a blue onion dome on his factory in the mid-19th century, it was to make an impression on travelers passing on the Connecticut River. The factory is about to make a good impression again, this time on passengers by car. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: July 30, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/parks/htfd_courant_073012_1.asp

Coltsville's Big Moment This Hartford Courant editorial expresses the opinion that we should not permit economic jitters to overshadow a momentous achievement. The development became official recently when U.S. Interior Secretary Dirk Kempthorne signed off on Hartford's Coltsville Historic District as a National Historic Landmark. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: October 19, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/economicdevelopment/htfd_courant_101908.asp

Coltsville's Big Shot This is a pivotal moment for Coltsville, the former factory town in south Hartford developed by 19th-century industrialist Samuel Colt. It has the momentum to become a major destination for visitors and an economic engine for the region. A new developer, Lance J. Robbins of Urban Smart Growth, is poised to take over rehabilitation of the iconic factory complex, which has been mired in financial uncertainty. At the same time, an extensive study of the feasibility of locating a national park there is ready to be submitted to the National Park Service. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: December 07, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/economicdevelopment/htfd_courant_120708.asp

Coltsville's Inspiring History Deserves Recognition In this editorial, the Hartford Courant expresses the opinion that the Colt Dome in Hartford represents an important part of Connecticut's rich history. It is a historic opportunity to create a prosperous future. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: July 24, 2011
Document Link: /issues/documents/parks/htfd_courant_072411.asp

Coltsville's Key Place In History The National Park Service recently held a hearing in Washington, D.C. to weigh an important proposal - naming one of Connecticut's most treasured sites, Coltsville in Hartford, as a National Historic Landmark. Sens. Christopher Dodd, Joe Lieberman and John Larson, as well as many members of the local community, have worked hard to bring Colt this well-deserved recognition. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: December 02, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_120207.asp

Confusion Reigns at Colt Colt Gateway developers want $14 million from the state or the Colt project will collapse. They say they are meeting with the state. The state says no meetings have taken place. Published by The Hartford Advocate ; Publication Date: October 04
Document Link: /issues/documents/economicdevelopment/htfd_advocate_100407.asp

Connecticut Court Considers: What Is A Good Education? Simon Bernstein sat in the front row of the courtroom recently as state Supreme Court justices, an assistant attorney general and two law students grappled over the meaning of his words. Back in 1965, Bernstein had been largely responsible for crafting an article added to the state constitution guaranteeing "free public elementary and secondary schools." A former Hartford alderman and Bloomfield school board member, Bernstein's experience with local school funding debates had convinced him of the need to make education a fundamental right. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: April 23, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/education/htfd_courant_042308.asp

Connecticut History on the Web This web site is devoted to providing history and social studies teachers and their students with materials and lessons on various topics on Connecticut history. Published by Mark Williams, History Teacher, Loomis Chaffee School
Document Link: /Issues/wsd/History/ct_history_on_web.asp

Connecticut History Online: Photographs, Drawings and Prints about Connecticut History The CHO website currently contains about 14,000 images of photographs, drawings and prints which may be searched or browsed in a variety of ways, including by keyword, subject, creator, title and date. Geographical sites may be searched using a Digital Geographic Locator developed by the University of Connecticut's Map and Geographic Information Center (MAGIC). Descriptions of the images are provided in detailed catalog records. Online learning tools created especially for middle and high school students provide suggestions for interpreting and exploring the database. Additional lesson plans, activities and photo essays designed by teacher advisors and educational consultants will be added in the future. Published by Connecticut Historical Society and others ; Publication Date: 2001
Document Link: /Issues/wsd/History/wsd_2001.asp

Connecticut History: Connecticut State Library This site contains links to Connecticut history sources by period and topic, as well as the State Library Catalog, Databases and E-Journals. Published by Connecticut State Library ; Publication Date: 2004
Document Link: /Issues/wsd/History/wsd_2004_b.asp

Connecticut Yankees Book Focuses On Soldiers' Tales In the years after the Civil War battle of Antietam, John Burnham of Hartford descended into madness. Alonzo Maynard of Ellington, who was shot four times in the struggle for Burnside Bridge, spent the rest of his years in physical agony, sometimes praying for death. In Enfield, Peter Mann's widow gave birth to a daughter four months after her husband succumbed to an awful wound he suffered on the western Maryland battlefield. The baby girl was named Antietam Burnside Mann. Author John Banks tells these stories and others in his recently published book, "Connecticut Yankees at Antietam." Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: September 02, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/region/htfd_courant_090213.asp

Connecticut's 375th: Settlement Date Established By Variety Of Factors Connecticut is celebrating the 375th anniversary of its founding with special events all year. This is the first installment of an occasional series looking back at the earliest chapters in the state's history. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: August 09, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_080910.asp

Conning, The Old-Line Hartford Insurance Consultancy, Looks To Europe, Asia With little public fanfare over the last decade, Conning & Co., a Hartford insurance services firm long known for its research, has tripled the amount of insurers' assets it manages — helping to lead an industry shift toward outsourcing. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: May 28, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/economicdevelopment/htfd_courant_052812.asp

Cooking by the Book: Amelia Simmons to Martha Stewart A look at the cookbooks currently on display in the Connecticut Historical Society shows historical aspects of New England cooking since the early years of the United States. Published by Real Hartford ; Publication Date: January 18, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/realhtfd_011813.asp

Council Approves Street Corner For Giles The Hartford City Council has approved the naming of a city corner after Abe Giles -- a city politician who died last year. Giles is a man remembered for his years in politics -- and for the corruption scandal that brought down a city mayor. Published by Capital Region Report, Jeff Cohen @ WNPR ; Publication Date: August 17, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/neighborhoods/jcohen_081712.asp

Coventry Sculptor David Hayes Dies David Hayes, a Hartford-born artist whose outdoor abstract sculptures constructed from welded steel grace the courtyards of numerous Connecticut buildings and have been collected by some of the nation's most prestigious museums, died of leukemia on April 9, 2103 at the age of 82 at his home in Coventry. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: April 11, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/artsandculture/htfd_courant_041113_1.asp

Crash At Butler-McCook Homestead Now Part Of Past A $1.3 million renovation of the historic Butler-McCook Homestead on Main Street in Hartford had just been finished when, on Aug. 4, 2002, a vehicle driven by Wilfredo Sanchez of Hartford crashed through a wall causing more than $700,000 in damage to the home, which is among Hartford's oldest, and its contents. While there is little inside the homestead today to bear witness to the crash, visitors are still eager to discuss the incident. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: April 18, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_041808.asp

Creating Colt Developer Lance Robbins isn't sugarcoating the challenges that remain to make Colt Gateway a viable part of the community. Published by The Hartford Advocate ; Publication Date: August 18, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/downtowndevelopment/htfd_advocate_081809.asp

Creative Possibility For Hartford Poet's Home In this opinion piece, Dennis Barone suggests that the Wallace Stevens’ house on Westerly Terrace would make a wonderful National Historic Site. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: November 19, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/History/htfd_courant_111906.asp

Credit Union, With Mob Ties In Its History, Closed This Week When the South End Mutual Benefit Association was shuttered recently by banking regulators, so went a once questionable Hartford banking tradition — one known principally among gangsters and FBI agents. Two decades ago, when the mafia in Connecticut was at its peak and legal casino gambling was just a dream, the mob made the credit union a "piggy bank" of sorts, using it to underwrite a multimillion-dollar, illegal gambling business. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: April 10, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/crime/htfd_courant_041010.asp

Crooner Tony Allen's Wonderful Life How Tony Allen, the 82-year-old legendary troubadour of Hartford's old Front Street, got started in the music biz 60 years ago sounds like something right out of the most upbeat scenarios in Frank Capra's Christmas classic, "It's a Wonderful Life." Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: December 12, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/artsandculture/htfd_courant_121210.asp

Cultivating Past Could Help Youth Grow Roots Tom Condon wonders if more people in their 20s would stay if they were more attuned to the history, the place, the stories of Connecticut. If you know who was here, and what they did, if you can see where they worked and lived, doesn't that hook you? Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: February 03, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_020308.asp

Curatorial Staff Makes A Mark Twain Discovery Anyone who saw the two women on their hands and knees in the library of the Mark Twain House in March might have thought they were cleaning. Chief curator Patti Philippon and curatorial associate Mallory Howard were, in fact, doing a bit of dusting. The two women who are the Twain museum's entire curatorial staff, were making an inventory the books in the library of the Victorian Gothic house on Farmington Avenue. As they rummaged through books, Howard and Philippon were stunned to find a long unaccounted-for book that had in fact been owned, or at least read, by Clemens. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: September 03, 2011
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_090311.asp

David Glass Closing Cake Business David Glass is closing his desserts business once again. In August of 2009, his company, Desserts By David Glass, went into bankruptcy, forcing Glass to shut down his Bloomfield wholesale bakery after 28 years. He reopened a smaller operation, called Vivie and David Glass’ Delicious Desserts, in an office park in South Windsor in December of 2010. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: September 05, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/economicdevelopment/htfd_courant_090512.asp

Day-Taylor House Is One From The Books The Day-Taylor house at 81 Wethersfield Ave. in Hartford was influenced by the work of Andrew Jackson Downing, a 19th century landscape architect. Constructed in 1858 by Hartford builders Hiram and Sylvester Bissell, it is an example of a style that Downing called "Italianate," since it is based on ordinary Italian farmhouses as depicted in popular landscape paintings of the time. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: April 1, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/History/htfd_courant_040107.asp

Debate Offers History-Making Moments The author expresses his opinion that as we watch this debate, we should reflect on the progress we have made as a country, remind ourselves as a nation how far we have come since 1962, and take a moment to recommit ourselves to the vital issues we face now and in the years ahead. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: September 26, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_092608.asp

Debating The Future Of The Old State House In Hartford In 1814, a group of New England Federalist politicians, unhappy with the conduct of the War of 1812, met in the council chamber of the Old State House to discuss seceding from the Union. History has brought resilient strength to the United States. But the 213-year-old downtown landmark has been plagued by financial uncertainty from its earliest days to this summer, as the state budget crisis leaves its immediate future uncertain. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: July 04, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/artsandculture/htfd_courant_070409.asp

Delegation Reintroduces Bill To Designate Coltsville As National Park Members of the state's legislative delegation have revived a bill that would designate the Coltsville Historical District in Hartford as a national park. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: July 13, 2011
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_071311.asp

Distressed Graveyard Honors Our Past, Epitomizes Our Present Hartford's Old North Cemetery, a place of forlorn but enduring beauty, is where you will find the graves of some of Connecticut’s most illustrious historic names: Wadsworth, Watkinson, Bushnell, Ellsworth, Olmsted. So too are Revolutionary and Civil War veterans, governors and congressmen. There are African-Americans and Hartford's early Jewish residents, Catholics and all those righteous Protestants who started it all. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: March 05, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_030512.asp

Doc Tells It Like It Should Be This article profiles Walter "Doc" Hurley, a former vice principal at Weaver High School, and mentor to generations of Hartford youth. The Doc Hurley Scholarship Foundation was created in 1975 to honor him. Today, it gives 18 scholarships, and has helped more than 430 young people pay for college. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: July 8, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_070806.asp

Documentary Recalls '61 Hartford Hospital Fire An account of a tragic fire at Hartford Hospital, "The Hartford Hospital Fire: Inferno On The 9th Floor," was recently shown on Connecticut Public Television. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: January 24, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_012412.asp

Does Historic Hartford House Really Have To Go? To stand on Wadsworth Street in Hartford's South Green neighborhood is to grind your teeth at neglect, bad planning and needless demolition. Now a 2 1/2-story, 130-year-old Italianate at 53 Wadsworth St., empty for several years but still salvageable, is threatened with demolition to make way for a building for the Institute for the Hispanic Family, a program of Catholic Charities. The loss of the building would be a shame, because the west side of Wadsworth Street still evokes Victorian Hartford. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: November 5, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/Neighborhoods/htfd_courant_110506.asp

Don't Glorify Colt Steve Thornton, a Hartford resident and a vice president of the New England Health Care Employees Union, District 1199/SEIU, writes that Hartford residents must be pretty desperate for heroes. Recent attempts to glorify gunmaker Samuel Colt may ignore some of the negative aspects of his life. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: September 24, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/History/htfd_courant_092406_a.asp

Dorothy Cheney Goodwin Dies Dorothy Cheney Goodwin, a highly respected member of the Connecticut General Assembly who worked tirelessly to improve educational opportunities for Connecticut children, died on June 10, 2007 at her Bloomfield home. She was 92. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: June 12, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/Region/htfd_courant_061207.asp

Early Courant Homes Not Around Anymore For Memorials Until The Hartford Courant moved to its current address at 285 Broad St., Hartford, it occupied several properties on or near Main Street. Early structures no longer stand, and Courant officials have no plans to memorialize the locations. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: April 4, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/History/htfd_courant_040407.asp

Echoes of Irish Martyrdom on Hartford's Maple Avenue In a neighborhood once teeming with immigrants from the Emerald Isle, many of whom were active in their support for Ireland's fight for independence, the Hunger Strike Memorial on the corner of Maple Avenue and Freeman Street in Hartford's South End holds significance far beyond the names and phrases. Just as the High Crosses were important in preserving and projecting stories for the early Irish population, so too does the modern likeness on Maple Avenue serve an equal purpose. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: March 13, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_031313.asp

Edward J. Bartek Rose From Horrific Childhood To Pillar Of Wisdom Ed Bartek triumphed over a childhood straight out of a Dickens novel to become a successful teacher and the creator of a philosophical worldview he called Trinityism. He died recently, after a full life during which he taught English at A.I. Prince Vocational Technical School in Hartford for 20 years and wrote more than 35 books. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: March 14, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_031410.asp

Edythe J. Gaines, 1922-2006 Edythe J. Gaines, the first African American and first woman to head the Hartford school system, died recently. Coming from New York City in 1975 to take the job of superintendent, her tenure was stormy. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: March 24, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/History/htfd_courant_032406.asp

Electric Cars Past And Future On Display Think the electric-powered car is a new invention? The 1904 electric Runabout had a range of 40 miles — same as the 2011 Chevrolet Volt, though the Volt gains an additional 300 miles with a nine-gallon gas tank and a gasoline motor that doesn't drive the car but recharges the battery. What comes around goes around, and the Chevrolet Volt occupies a revolving stage at the Connecticut International Auto Show, which ran in November at the Connecticut Convention Center in downtown Hartford. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: November 19, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_111910.asp

Electronics Repair Shop To Close After Long, Long Run Herbert Rubenstein's TV and electronics repair shop in Hartford has been in the business of fixing TVs, stereo equipment and other electronic devices for 64 years. After six years in a first-floor warren of rooms in a historic industrial building, so filled with vintage equipment and old documents that a move seems impossible, Rubenstein says he's closing shop. But, he is not retiring, he's going virtual. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: December 10, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_121010.asp

Elegance Restored: Hartford Landmark Reopens The Isham-Terry House was built in 1854 at a time when the northern part of downtown was becoming home to the carriage trade. So it was in 1896 when Dr. Oliver Isham, a bachelor, bought the 15-room mansion for his home and practice and moved in with his teenage sisters, who cared for him and served as his receptionists. The house reopened as a museum recently. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: June 29, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_062912.asp

Ella Little Cromwell Dies At 88 As a girl growing up in Hartford, Ella Little Cromwell saw the barriers that often kept blacks and other minorities from participating in the political process - barriers that threatened to keep her and her community from realizing their full potential, her friends and family members recalled. Cromwell, who died recently at age 88, spent the rest of her life breaking those barriers down. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: September 18, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/History/htfd_courant_091806.asp

Ellsworth Grant, Former West Hartford Mayor and State Historian, Dies At 95 Ellsworth Strong Grant – a former West Hartford mayor, historian and the brother-in-law of Katharine Hepburn – died on March 6, 2012. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: March 14, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_031413.asp

Emhart Name Might Regain Prominence In Connecticut With Stanley-Black & Decker Merger From its pre- World War I origins in Hartford, Emhart Corp. grew into an international hardware enterprise with 32,000 employees. Its sale to Black & Decker Corp. in 1989 led quickly to fragmentation, and a conglomerate decades in the making began to fade from view. But, with The Stanley Works now in the process of buying Black & Decker for $4.5 billion in stock, the Emhart name seems likely to regain some of its former prominence in Connecticut. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: November 09, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/economicdevelopment/htfd_courant_110909.asp

Ethel May Austin: A Tireless Advocate For Senior Citizens Ethel Austin, a well-known advocate for senior citizens died on Dec. 27, 2011 at age 96. She sang tenor in a women's barbershop group and championed the Asylum Hill community where she lived in Hartford. Charming and outgoing, she was an independent, pioneering career woman who never married. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: January 20, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_012012.asp

Everybody Forgets...Or Didn't Know Mike McGarry reminisces about the changes in Hartford to the area where Walmart and the Hartford Jobs Academy are today, and where a public housing complex called Charter Oak Terrace once stood. Published by The Hartford News ; Publication Date: January 17, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_news_011713.asp

Ex-City Council Member Dies Steven D. Park, a former Hartford city councilman who in the late 1990s was considered one of Hartford's rising political stars, died Sunday, January 20, 2008, from an infection associated with kidney disease, his family and friends said. He was 58. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: January 23, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/government/htfd_courant_012308.asp

Exceptional Miss Uccello Forty years ago this week, Hartford made history. Ann Uccello was inaugurated as mayor, becoming the first woman to hold the post and the first woman elected mayor of a capital city in the country. She would go on to serve two terms, narrowly lose a congressional race and then serve in a high-ranking post in Washington. Friends, supporters and family members would like to celebrate the anniversary of her election with some kind of memorial in Hartford. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: December 04, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/government/htfd_courant_120407.asp

Exit, Stage Right Michael Wilson, the outgoing artistic director of Hartford Stage, is about to make Manhattan his permanent home after 13 years. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: June 19, 2011
Document Link: /issues/documents/artsandculture/htfd_courant_061911.asp

Factory Fixer: New Sheriff Takes On Colt Rehabilitation of the historic Colt firearms factory, with its landmark blue onion dome, is about to resume full bore under new and enthusiastic management. This is good news for the capital city and for Connecticut on many levels, both economic and aesthetic. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: March 29, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_032909.asp

Famed Baker Dead At Age 86 Michele Mozzicato, the founder of Modern Pastry Shop, died Saturday, February 2, 2008, almost 50 years after he opened what has turned into a three-generation family business known for its fresh fruit and whipped cream cakes, traditional Italian rum cakes and cannoli. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: February 06, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_020608.asp

Farewell to the "Queen of the Hill”: Ethel Austin, 1915-2011 Hartford and The Hartford News lost one of its best friends on Tuesday, December 20, 2011 as Ethel M. Austin passed away three months shy of her 97th birthday Published by The Hartford News ; Publication Date: January 05, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/neighborhoods/htfd_news_010512.asp

Farmers Market Yields Some Help; Dispatches from Garden Street Eating healthy in the 'hood... It's not easy finding healthy and affordable food here. On one end of Albany Avenue, there's a Dunkin' Donuts and a Subway; on the other, a McDonald's. And in between are lots of bodegas and convenience stores that people here told us pretty much extort the already poor and vulnerable by extending credit with exorbitant interest rates. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: August 08, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/neighborhoods/htfd_courant_080809.asp

Fatman Dies, Legend Lives On Daniel Tedesco, a big-hearted bookie and the last stand-up guy in Hartford, died recently of old age and its myriad afflictions. He was 84. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: July 21, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/History/htfd_courant_072107.asp

Fiddle Contest Organizer Paul LeMay Dies With little more than charisma and force of will, Paul LeMay managed to turn an improbable idea into a Hartford phenomenon, bringing tens of thousands to the city for an annual fiddle contest. LeMay died Friday, January 30, 2009. He was 65. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: February 03, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/artsandculture/htfd_courant_020309.asp

Fifty Years Of Great Theater Happy 50th anniversary to Hartford Stage and the Goodspeed Opera House in East Haddam. Long Wharf and Yale Repertory Theater, both in New Haven, will celebrate their golden anniversaries in the next few years. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: July 03, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/artsandculture/htfd_courant_070313.asp

Fighter For Peace The poor, the unemployed, the hungry and the downtrodden in Hartford lost one of the best friends they ever had recently when the Rev. Roger W. Floyd died of cancer at 82. As executive director of the Capitol Region Conference of Churches from 1982 to 2000, the Rev. Floyd defined the word "activist." Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: August 08, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/faithcommunity/htfd_courant_080813.asp

Filling the Donut Hole: A West End Historic District Effort Recently, Hartford’s West End Civic Association held a meeting for property owners along Whitney, Oxford and Fern Streets in an area known as the “donut hole” in a national historic district north of Farmington Avenue. A grant-funded effort is underway to apply for national register status so the donut hole is included—an area with 59 multi-family residences mixed with 42 single-family homes. Published by Urban Compass ; Publication Date: May 06, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/ucompass_050610.asp

Final Piece Of Former Board Of Education Building To Be Demolished Citing safety and maintenance issues, the city has decided to demolish what remains of the facade of the former board of education building that was to be featured in a new, $77 million public safety complex. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: April 11, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/neighborhoods/htfd_courant_041110_1.asp

Final Renovation Of Historic Amos Bull House Breaks Ground The final phase of a $2.4 million restoration of the historic Amos Bull House began with a ceremonial groundbreaking. The restoration project, which began in 2008, includes mechanical and structural upgrades and cosmetic improvements to the house, built in 1789. The renovations will create a community education space, permanent offices for Connecticut Landmarks administration, and a climate-controlled archive storage facility in the connecting Butler-McCook Carriage House. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: July 10, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_071013.asp

Final Reunion At St. Joseph's Recently, the last class reunion was held at the former St. Joseph Cathedral School on Asylum Avenue. The building is being converted into 28 two- and three-bedroom apartments for poor families by the Catholic Charities. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: June 11, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/Housing/htfd_courant_061107.asp

Fire Chief Teale, The Real Deal For Hartford Fire Chief Charles A. Teale Sr., it was unfinished business, a matter of duty and responsibility. There was no monument to the 168 people who died in the horrible Hartford circus fire of July 6, 1944. He knew there needed to be a memorial before the generation that remembered the state's worst fire passed on. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: November 27, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_112709.asp

Five Hundred Thousand Dollars Or More Stolen; Woman To Plead Guilty A former employee at the Mark Twain House & Museum who was under investigation after more than $500,000 was stolen from the organization is expected to enter a guilty plea in U.S. District Court in Bridgeport. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: August 05, 2011
Document Link: /issues/documents/artsandculture/htfd_courant_080511.asp

Fleeing the North End A panel discussion about a new book, “Remembering the Old Neighborhood,” on Hartford’s North End sheds some light on white flight. Published by The Hartford Advocate ; Publication Date: February 11, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_advocate_021110.asp

Foot Guard Hall an Underused Asset Lt. Col. Robert A. Burnham of the First Company wishes more people would visit Foot Guard Hall on High Street and enlist. The hall has fallen out of memory and into disrepair, but its historical value merits interest. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: May 22, 2005
Document Link: /issues/documents/artsandculture/htfd_courant_052205.asp

For 100th, Hartford Should Do Twain Proud Mark Twain was not big on anniversaries. "What ought to be done to the man who invented the celebrating of anniversaries? Mere killing would be too light," he observed. But even the great curmudgeon acknowledged that anniversaries were "very well up to a certain point." For Hartford and Connecticut, that point might be next April 21. That is the 100th anniversary of the death of Samuel Clemens, aka Mark Twain, the incomparable writer, wit, social critic and world citizen. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: October 25, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/artsandculture/htfd_courant_102509.asp

For Locksmith, Compensation Is The Key Salvatore Scalia's business, City Key Safe & Lock Service, is being forced out of the storefront it has occupied since 2001 to make way for the city's new public safety complex. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: October 11, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/economicdevelopment/htfd_courant_101107.asp

For Students Facing Long School Day, Supper Is Served A free meal at school for breakfast, lunch — and dinner? About 450 city students have been eating supper in school cafeterias as part of a government-funded meal program that may expand in Hartford and also to other Connecticut school systems this year. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: January 16, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/familiesandchildren/htfd_courant_011612.asp

For Vintage Base Ball, A Field Of Their Own In the 1870s, Hartford residents made their way to a field on the Colt property southeast of downtown to watch the still-new game of "base ball." Now they are doing it again. A nonprofit called The Friends of Vintage Base Ball has brought an early version of the national pastime back to the city. The players wear the uniforms and use the rules developed in the 19th century. The games are free and a lot of fun. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: July 25, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_072509.asp

Former Broker Sees Brighter Future For City When Bobsie Ness was a commercial real estate broker, she played a role in selling or leasing space in every major building in downtown Hartford, some two and three times over, during the 1980s and 1990s. Before Ness left the office leasing business in 2004, she saw leasing recover, and now, she says there are other signs that Hartford is on course for a true revitalization. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: August 1, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/EconomicDevelopment/htfd_courant_080106_a.asp

Former City Councilman John O'Connell, 65, Dies John O'Connell, a longtime Republican councilman known for his budgetary expertise and sharp wit, died Wednesday. He was 65. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: September 21, 2011
Document Link: /issues/documents/government/htfd_courant_092111.asp

Former City Councilwoman Maria Gonzalez Dies At 72 Maria B. Gonzalez, a former city councilwoman, Hartford public school teacher and community activist, has died. She was 72. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: February 02, 2011
Document Link: /issues/documents/government/htfd_courant_020211.asp

Former Hartford Mayors Again Witnesses To History In 1981, Thirman Milner became Hartford's first black mayor, and by extension, the first elected to run a New England city. Carrie Saxon Perry followed in 1987, the first black woman to run Hartford and the first to gain such a post in any major Northeastern city But their lives had crossed well before their 1980s claim to the mayor's office. They were among the hundreds of thousands who marched on Washington with the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. They were there when King made a speech that would gain unforeseen power over time — until it landed recently with uncanny resonance at the feet of a black man accepting a presidential nomination. Forty-five years later, to the day. And Milner and Perry had come to see it, this far end of The Dream. They agreed to accept U.S. Rep. John Larson's own Democratic National Convention tickets when he offered — two floor seats for the night in which Barack Obama would claim his nomination to be the presidential nominee. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: August 29, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/government/htfd_courant_082908.asp

Former Hartford Pastor Dies The Rev. Mark Welch Jr., former pastor at the former Horace Bushnell Congregational Church in Hartford, died at his home in Andover, Mass., on New Year's Day, 2008. He was 70. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: January 04, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/faithcommunity/htfd_courant_010408.asp

Fort Would Make Dutch Connection Mike McGarry expresses the opinion that the announcement that Northwest Airlines will start daily nonstop service next summer between Amsterdam and Bradley International Airport will change our lives in Greater Hartford to a degree little understood today. For many travelers in Southern New England and New York, the time devoted to European trips will be halved. Our new connection with the Dutch will bring substantial benefits to travelers and businesses. One way to celebrate and enhance the new air service would be to join New York in a major celebration of our Dutch heritage. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: November 26, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/History/htfd_courant_112606.asp

Forum on Form: High Victorian Gothic The Mark Twain House is a good example of High Victorian Gothic. What we notice first about the Mark Twain house is the house's picturesque form — "the nooks and angles and gables too" — and the ways that architect Edward Tuckerman Potter tied the building to its setting. The big windows and porches and balconies provided views of the surrounding scenery, which in the 1870s was more picturesque than now: Down the hill, where Hartford Public High School and its athletic fields now stand, were peaceful meadows and a winding river. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: July 06, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_070608.asp

Four Hundred Ten Asylum Is A Go In this editorial, the Courant praises the nonprofit organization, Common Ground, for restoring the historic Capitol Building at 410 Asylum St. in Hartford. The building will contain 70 units of affordable and market-rate housing with retail and commercial space on the ground floor. It will also be the first Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design-certified "green" multifamily building in the state, and will even have a green roof. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: May 27, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/downtowndevelopment/htfd_courant_052708.asp

Four Hundred Thousand Donated to NINA Efforts Northside Institutions Neighborhood Alliance recently received a grant for $400,000 to further their efforts to restore historic buildings in Hartford. One which the Alliance restored is the Victorian Lady, the 19th century home that was saved from the wrecking ball by being moved from Sigourney Street to Ashley Street in 2004. The restoration was recently featured on a Home and Garden Television (HGTV) show, Restore America. Published by The Hartford News ; Publication Date: November 8 - 15, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/History/htfd_news_110806.asp

Fox School Rededication Recalls Pioneering Namesake Hartford recently rededicated its largest elementary school to Michael D. Fox, possibly the most controversial and devoted educator ever to serve as superintendent of schools in the city. Fox was not only one of the most successful superintendents, he was also one of the longest serving. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: August 28, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/education/htfd_courant_082813.asp

Fred Jacobs Worked To Keep Memories Of Holocaust From Fading Fred Jacobs made it a mission to make sure the Holocaust was kept alive. Jacobs, 91, of West Hartford, died of cancer on May 15, 2012 after suffering from Alzheimer's disease for several years. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: August 17, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_081712.asp

Friends in High Places Work on Colt Gateway, the plan to convert the former Colt armories into apartments and retail, remains stalled as developer Robert MacFarlane struggles to untangle himself from the $60 million he owes to a bankrupt Las Vegas lender and pay his delinquent city property taxes of nearly half a million dollars. Published by The Hartford Advocate ; Publication Date: November 29, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/economicdevelopment/htfd_advocate_112907.asp

Friends of Vintage Base Ball The Friends of Vintage Base Ball is a nonprofit organization dedicated to the promotion of the game as it was played in the 19th century. The purpose is to facilitate and preserve the customs, culture, history and spirit of vintage base ball through public education, awareness and participation. The organization was formed in the late summer of 2008 in response to a need to create a permanent field for the play of vintage (19th century) base ball in Hartford, Connecticut. They partnered with the Coalition to Strengthen the Sheldon/Charter Oak Neighborhood (CSS/CON) and the City of Hartford, Connecticut to designate a field of play in Colt Park for vintage base ball. Published by Friends of Vintage Base Ball
Document Link: /issues/wsd/Parks/wsd_060909.asp

From Buckets To Pumpers To Hook-And-Ladders The early days of the Hartford Fire Department are reviewed in this article. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: November 14, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_111407.asp

From China To Hartford, Elsie Jane Yung's Historic Connection Elsie Jane Yung was a Connecticut resident in spirit only, but she chose Hartford as her final resting place for reasons that go back to the 19th century. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: June 14, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_061409.asp

From Plaza Mayor To Raised Garden Beds Two empty lots that mark the gateway to Hartford's Latino community were meant to have a main square, a banquet facility and luxury condos. But those plans died years ago. And now, these two big corners of city land are home to a a new community garden. Published by Capital Region Report, Jeff Cohen @ WNPR ; Publication Date: July 13, 2011
Document Link: /issues/documents/neighborhoods/jcohen_071311.asp

Fuller Brush, Now Bankrupt, Was Kind To Hartford The famed Fuller Brush Co., which has filed for bankruptcy protection, got its start in Hartford more than a century ago. Its troubles notwithstanding, it is still a good example of why manufacturing is important to a community. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: March 08, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_030812.asp

Fundraising Begins For King Statues In Hartford Organizers recently announced plans to raise the money and build statues memorializing the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and his wife, Coretta Scott King to be located on the former site of a monument to the city's Northwest residents who served in World War II. The monument that once stood at Aaron Fien Square at the Woodland Street entrance to Keney Park was dedicated in 1944. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: April 26, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/neighborhoods/htfd_courant_042608.asp

Future of Key City Intersection To Be Decided Tonight The Hartford Redevelopment Agency will choose one of two groups to turn the barren intersection at Park and Main streets into a gateway to the city's Hispanic commercial center on Park Street. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: October 13, 2005
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_101305.asp

G. Fox: Revisiting A Magical Place And Time The author writes of his memories of the G. Fox department store at Christmas. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: December 25, 2011
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_122511.asp

Gene Solon Helped Make Hartford A Jazz Mecca As the ebullient, omnipresent Zelig of Hartford's arts world, Gene Solon seemed to pop up everywhere on the local scene, at art gallery openings, classical music concerts or jazz events, at established or obscure venues for the most accessible or the most arcane, avant-garde visual and musical genres. He died peacefully on Oct. 6, 2008, in Tucson Ariz. at the age of 83. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: November 09, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/artsandculture/htfd_courant_110908.asp

George Evica Dies; Longtime Radio Commentator For two generations, George Michael Evica, an emeritus professor at University of Hartford, was known internationally as the grandfather of all John F. Kennedy assassination researchers. For people who listened to his multiple lectures at JFK assassination conferences, to his nearly 40 years of Hartford classroom lectures, or to his long-running weekly half-hour radio show on WWUH, "Assassination Journal," Evica was a heavily resourced, highly intelligent nudge toward the truth. That voice was silenced Saturday, November 10, 2008. Evica, of Hartford, died after multiple illnesses, including cancer and brain tumors. He was a month short of his 80th birthday. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: November 12, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/education/htfd_courant_111207.asp

George Ritter Dead; Longtime Politician George J. Ritter, who was on Hartford City Council from 1959 to 1968, and who served in the General Assembly from 1968 to 1980, died Sunday, July 18, 2010 at the age of 90. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: July 18, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_071810_1.asp

George Ritter, Former Hartford City Councilman and Longtime Politician, Dead At 90 George J. Ritter, who was on the Hartford City Council from 1959 to 1968 and served in the General Assembly from 1968 to 1980, died Sunday, July 18, 2010. He was 90. Published by Hartford Cityline, The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: July 19, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/government/cityline_071910_1.asp

George Ritter: He Played To Win In this editorial, the Hartford Courant memorializes George J. Ritter, who died on July 18, 2010, and who was a major player in Hartford politics in the middle of the last century, serving on the city council from 1959 to 1968 and in the General Assembly, from Hartford's 1st District, from 1968 to 1980. He also served as deputy mayor and corporation counsel. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: July 20, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_072010.asp

Gertrude Blanks, Community Storyteller Gertrude Blanks is a well known Hartford storyteller. Although she was born in Baltimore, Maryland in the 1920’s, she has called Hartford home since she was five years old. After eight decades, Gertrude Blanks continues to tell stories. She spends twenty hours a week at the Simpson Waverly School helping pre-school aged children and their teachers with tasks as needed. Published by Northend Agent's ; Publication Date: August 05, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/neighborhoods/northend_agents_080509.asp

Get Pep Ideas Off The Mat Stan Simpson asks, Why not name part of the Front Street project for Willie Pep, a colorful character who was reared in the city, who frequented Front Street as a kid and in the 1940s became one of the greatest prize fighters ever. All the elements are in place to expand, enhance and expedite a meaningful memorial for Pep. The Connecticut Boxing Hall of Fame is looking for a home to showcase the state's rich boxing history. ESPN has long committed to some sort of role at the convention center site. Pep Park would be an attraction to a convention city. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: December 13, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/History/htfd_courant_121306.asp

Ghost Hunters Returns To Mark Twain House Hartford's historic Nook Farm has become a hotbed of paranormal activity of late, at least as it involves national TV shows. Just months after "Ghost Hunters" visited both the Mark Twain Home and Museum and the Harriet Beecher Stowe Center, the producers have lugged the detecting equipment and flashlights back to the onetime home of Samuel Clemens — just so a new group of ghost-hunting hopefuls can see if they can turn up some paranormal evidence as well. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: June 14, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_061410.asp

Give Us Freedom Or Death A piece of Hartford history that has largely faded from memory around these parts is being celebrated in England. The London-based newspaper Guardian Unlimited recently featured a speech given by English suffragist Emmeline Pankhurst at the Parsons Theater in Hartford in 1913. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: April 27, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/History/htfd_courant_042707.asp

Gladys Is Gone, And One City Restaurant Is A Bit Less Spicy Gladys Moore - a waitress at Timothy's Restaurant for decades - died recently at 80. Moore was no mere waitress, though. She was a cut-up, a great-grandmother, an expert cake-froster, a friend, and - after declining health prevented her from officially working at Timothy's - she occupied the first booth every day from 1:30 p.m. to closing, sipping her Diet Coke, wrapping silverware in paper napkins, hopping up to help wait tables if the night waitress was late and chatting with regulars. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: April 5, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_040506.asp

Goodbye, Old Shoe The owner of a Park Road retail landmark - the Bazilians shoe store his family started in 1930 - is retiring to climb mountains, ride motorcycles and do other stuff he missed out on for decades because of work. Marc Bazilian, the store's owner and operator, will turn 65 in July 2007, and plans to retire by the end of the summer, if he can sell the business and sell or lease his building. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: June 2, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/History/htfd_courant_060207.asp

Graduate Of City Schools Shares His History Sanford Cloud knows a bit about history — he's made some himself. Born and raised in Hartford, a graduate of city schools, Cloud was the first African American lawyer hired at the city firm of Robinson and Cole in 1969. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: September 17, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/education/htfd_courant_091710.asp

Grand 1912 Plan Helped Shape Hartford Hartford's iQuilt plan, which focuses on the arts and cultural institutions around Bushnell Park, is one of many land-use master plans and studies produced for the city. The most prominent of these plans is arguably the 1912 Carrere and Hastings plan. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: April 10, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_041013.asp

Grand Vision For Hartford's Northwest School The old Northwest School on Albany Avenue, the vacant, crumbling building in the city's North End has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places. Although the roof leaks, there is no electricity or running water, and chunks of plaster lay in piles on the floor, but a small group of organizers hope to raise $3 million to restore and transform the building into the John E. Rogers African American Cultural Center, a showcase for what they say is one of the largest privately owned collections of African American historical artifacts. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: October 02, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_100210.asp

Grant Puts Kids in Touch With American History Students from eight elementary schools in the city are taking part in a program funded by a $925,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Education. The grant is designed to improve student achievement by providing teachers with a better understanding and appreciation of American history, which they pass on to their students. Susan Hoffman Fishman, manager of the three-year grant, said "Hartford was attractive because of the need for professional development. Better teachers make better students." Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: March 17, 2005
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_031705.asp

Grants To Help Renovate Three Historic Buildings Three locations in Hartford have been chosen to receive more than $40,000 in historic preservation and technical assistance grants. The money will be used to help foster jobs and preserve the city's heritage through the renovation of historic buildings and improvements in their energy efficiency. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: February 23, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_022310.asp

Graphic Evolution The secret to Joseph Merritt & Co.’s 100-year survival and success has been its ability to evolve and adapt to the demands of the marketplace. Merritt has grown from a small blueprinting company on Pearl Street to a high-tech industry leader that prints board games and 90-foot banners and has scanned and indexed a historic journal from one of Charles Darwin’s trips to the Galapagos Islands in 20 minutes. Published by The Hartford Business Journal ; Publication Date: July 28, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/economicdevelopment/hbj_072808.asp

Gratitude Etched In Stone The groundbreaking recently for the $1.2 million Connecticut State Veterans Memorial in Rocky Hill will continue a process — honoring veterans living and dead — that reached an apogee 150 years ago. Connecticut's people have expressed deep and heartfelt gratitude and appreciation to veterans of all wars. But when it comes to creating monuments to veterans, The Civil War stands alone. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: November 14, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_111410.asp

Ground Broken For State Veterans Memorial A memorial to honor the 1.5 million Connecticut veterans who have served their country since the Revolutionary War has finally found a home. The search for a home for the memorial began in 2007. The initial plan was for the memorial to be built in Rocky Hill, across from the State Veteran's Home. But the cost – about $1.5 million – and a lack of support from veterans who felt the memorial should be built in the capital city, led state veterans Commissioner Linda Schwartz to seek an alternative. The new site for the memorial is Minuteman Park, between the state armory and the legislative office building. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: April 22, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_042213.asp

Groundbreaking Students, 40 Years Later About two dozen people gathered to reminisce about Project Concern, a landmark school integration program begun 40 years ago. It was a program that survived financial problems in the 1980s and '90s and nearly closed down after being hailed as one of the nation's first voluntary school integration programs. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: September 24, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/History/htfd_courant_092406.asp

Group Seeks Memorabilia For Exhibit On Bulkeley Stadium Morgan G. Bulkeley Stadium may not have been the "House that Ruth Built," but it was among the legion of baseball parks where the Babe pounded balls over the wall. But about 10 years ago, a group of current and former city residents who watched and played games in Bulkeley Stadium led an effort to create a lasting memory. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: September 22, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_092208.asp

Gun Debate Shouldn't Stall Coltsville Park Effort That Connecticut's congressional delegation is battling for gun safety legislation while trying to have a historic gun manufactory designated a National Historic Park is a perhaps unfortunate coincidence — but nothing more than that. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: April 11, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_041113.asp

Gun Manufacturers Pull Support For National Park Proposal Saying that anti-gun legislators are hypocrites, a prominent gun lobby has withdrawn support for a federal bill that would create the Coltsville National Historical Park in Hartford. The National Shooting Sports Foundation, which represents gun manufacturers that include Colt's Manufacturing Co. and is based in Newtown, has sent a letter to members of the all-Democratic Connecticut congressional delegation and Gov. Dannel P. Malloy declaring that it is deceitful to support the national park and gun-control laws at the same time. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: July 09, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_070913.asp

Hal Holbrook, Who Has Played Mark Twain For 56 Years, Returns To Hartford For One Night Only It's anniversary time at the Mark Twain House & Museum and the Hartford home is gearing up for a year-long celebration of a series of mileposts: the 100th anniversary of the author's death, the 175th anniversary of his birth and the 125th anniversary of the publication of "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn." Kicking off the year's events is the sold-out presentation of "Mark Twain Tonight!" at the University of Hartford's Lincoln Theater by a man who has become synonymous with the American author: Hal Holbrook. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: January 17, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/artsandculture/htfd_courant_011710_1.asp

Happy Birthday, Noah In an appropriately creative commemoration of Noah Webster's birth, The Noah Webster House & West Hartford Historical Society — located in Mr. Webster's childhood home on South Main Street in West Hartford — is sponsoring a reading of the headwords (the words that are defined) in the 1828 dictionary. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: April 30, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/region/htfd_courant_043008.asp

Hard Times At Twain's House One of Hartford's international landmarks struggles to remain fully funded and relevant. Observers in the arts community voiced guarded optimism about the Twain House's future. Published by The Hartford Advocate ; Publication Date: May 08, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_advocate_050808.asp

Harriet Beecher Stowe House Wins National Historic Designation The home of abolitionist author Harriet Beecher Stowe has joined the Hartford homes of Mark Twain and gun maker Samuel Colt on an exclusive list -- it has been designated a National Historic Landmark by the Interior Department. Published by CT Mirror ; Publication Date: March 11, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/ct_mirror_031113.asp

Harry Merrow Dies; Advocate For Justice Harry Franklin Merrow, a champion of social and racial justice in the Hartford area and a moral mentor to city leaders, died on Aug. 1, 2007 in Bloomfield. He was 82. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: August 3, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/History/htfd_courant_080307.asp

Hartford Activist Willie Long Dies Willie C. Long, a community activist known for her work with Hartford's senior citizens, died on November 11, 2007 at her Tower Avenue home. She was 86. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: November 14, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_111407_1.asp

Hartford Audubon Society Celebrates Century Of Conservation Hartford Audubon, one of the state's oldest conservation groups, was founded 100 years ago. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: September 24, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/environment/htfd_courant_092408.asp

Hartford Club Reinventing Itself When two amateur boxers recently squared off in The Hartford Club’s ballroom, some spectators wondered if the club’s legendary mystique had finally vanished. Published by The Hartford Business Journal ; Publication Date: May 03, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/downtowndevelopment/hbj_050310.asp

Hartford Conservatory's End: A Sad Note After 120 years, The Hartford Conservatory is bringing down the curtain. The closing was probably inevitable, despite heroic and imaginative efforts to stay in business. Yet, it is sad. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: October 17, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/artsandculture/htfd_courant_101710.asp

Hartford Could Borrow From Southern Cities If you are not in a hurry, Amtrak is a very pleasant way to travel. One wishes it were a bit faster and a tiny bit smoother in part, but it's comfortable and pleasant. Republicans since Ronald Reagan have tried to kill the federal subsidy for Amtrak, so it may be a miracle that service is as good as it is. But, President Barack Obama needs to keep pushing for high- or just higher-speed rail. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: October 03, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_100312.asp

Hartford Council Considers Naming Site For Giles The Hartford city council is considering a proposal to add Abraham Giles' name to a North End street corner. Giles, an embattled former state representative, died last year at age 84. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: March 26, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/neighborhoods/htfd_courant_032612.asp

Hartford Fire Chief Retires Hartford Fire Chief Edward Casares Jr. retired effective June 15, 2013, city officials said recently. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: April 29, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/government/htfd_courant_042913.asp

Hartford History This site concerns the history of Hartford, and includes writing, photographs and more. Published by Kevin W. Flood ; Publication Date: 2004
Document Link: /Issues/wsd/History/wsd_2004_a.asp

Hartford Library Starts Circus Fire Scrapbook Project David Fitzgerald doesn't remember much of the Hartford circus fire that killed his 3-year-old brother. He remembers the 95-degree temperatures on July 6, 1944. He remembers jumping on a crowded bus with his brother, mother and next-door neighbors to go to the circus. He remembers sitting high on the wooden bleachers, and seeing orange flames to his left. But that's where his memory stops. On Saturday, 69 years after the fire, which killed an estimated 168 people and injured another 700, Fitzgerald, armed with photos and books about the fire, attended the Hartford Public Library kickoff for a year-long scrapbook project librarians are starting. Memories from survivors like Fitzgerald will be collected and presented in one large scrapbook next year at the 70th anniversary of the fire. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: July 07, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_070713.asp

Hartford Loses Its Best Friend There was only one Mayor Mike. He was always himself, whether he was talking to the President of the United States or some guy he’d just met on the street. Mayor Mike Peters passed away recently and is remembered by writer Mike McGarry. Published by The Hartford News ; Publication Date: January 08, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_news_010809.asp

Hartford Mourns Death Of Daniel Carey, City And Town Clerk When the crowd gathers today for Mayor Mike's tailgate party at Rentschler Field, the familiar face at the grill won't be there. Daniel M. Carey — the affable Hartford city and town clerk with a football heart in New York, a baseball heart in Boston and a UConn heart on fall Saturdays — was found dead in his home in the city's South End Friday, September 11, 2009. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: September 12, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/government/htfd_courant_091209.asp

Hartford Newspapers Scrambled For Stories Of 2 Titanic Survivors During those frantic days after the Titanic went down, as newspapers scrambled for any fresh morsel about the ship and its 2,223 passengers, the race was on to reach the eyewitnesses who could tell the story transfixing the world. And in the two-newspaper town of Hartford 1912, the tales to be told by two of the most prominent Connecticut passengers — "veterans of the game of globetrotting," as The Courant called them — were the sought-after prizes. As it happens, Richard L. Beckwith, a financier formerly of Hartford, and William T. Sloper, a restless and sickly New Britain native son, were among the handful to climb into the first lifeboats lowered from the doomed, unsinkable vessel. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: April 14, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_041412.asp

Hartford Pew Review: Congregation Beth Israel One block over the line in West Hartford, Congregation Beth Israel’s presence announces itself much like the Unitarian Society of Hartford and the Cathedral of Saint Joseph do. There’s no quietly blending in with the neighborhood; no way to pass without noticing. Published by Real Hartford ; Publication Date: March 27, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/faithcommunity/realhtfd_032713.asp

Hartford Preservation Alliance The website of the Hartford Preservation Alliance (HPA) which is a professionally-operated, volunteer-assisted non-profit organization dedicated to the preservation and revitalization of the unique architectural heritage and neighborhood character of Hartford, Connecticut. Published by Hartford Preservation Alliance
Document Link: /Issues/wsd/History/htfd_preservation.asp

Hartford Preservation Alliance Presents Annual Awards Recently, the Hartford Preservation Alliance held its annual awards ceremony. Awards were presented to organizations, companies and individuals who have made significant contributions to the preservation of Hartford’s architectural heritage. Published by The Hartford News ; Publication Date: May 16 - 23, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/Neighborhoods/htfd_news_051607_a.asp

Hartford Public High School Commemorates Alumni Killed in World War II Hartford Public High School, one of the oldest public schools in the country, practically oozes history. But among the dinosaur tracks, old portraits and other historical objects is a memorial plaque commemorating one of the more somber periods in the school's history. The plaque bears the names of 93 Hartford Public High School students who gave their lives for their country in World War II. In all, 2,598 students served during the war. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: November 11, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_111110.asp

Hartford Residents At Hearing Support Plan To Name Site After Giles Abraham Giles was known for different things during his several decades in the city. But recently, his accomplishments were the center of discussion as dozens of supporters urged city council members to approve a proposal naming a North End street corner after the former politician. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: April 17, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_041712.asp

Hartford Studies Project This project of Trinity College is designed to encourage students and faculty to explore Hartford's history and present experience of issues such as race, immigration, culture, labor, and local politics. The Hartford Studies Project
  • Maintains an archive documenting the city's history since the 1880s
  • Sponsors a course, “The History of Hartford,” twice a year for undergraduate and graduate students
  • Organizes public events, such as photography exhibits and public forums, to promote informed discussion of the city's past and present
Published by Trinity College ; Publication Date: 2004
Document Link: /Issues/wsd/History/wsd_2004_c.asp

Hartford Treasures on Display History nerds should stop by the third floor of the Hartford Public Library before September 30th, 2010. There is an array of materials on display, from photographs to books to old posters advertising “ponderous” events. Published by Real Hartford ; Publication Date: July 30, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/realhtfd_073010.asp

Hartford Turns Over Treasure Trove Of Public Records To Library Think you pay too many taxes? Hartford firearms tycoon Samuel Colt paid taxes on 20 houses, 274 acres of land, four stores and even on his clocks and musical instruments. That's just one example of a wealth of facts and interesting tidbits contained in thousands of recently cataloged public documents chronicling city life back to 1639. The public documents have spent hundreds of years stored and — in some cases — stuffed into the nooks and crannies of city hall's five-story vault. They have recently been transferred to the Hartford History Center at the Hartford Public Library. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: November 17, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_111710.asp

Hartford's Better Story Recently the Boys & Girls Clubs of America’s Hartford chapter in the North End was host to President George W. Bush. He was there to honor the agency for contributing $25,000 to his malaria initiative, a program that provides netting to keep mosquitoes from biting African children at night. The national organization, which offers a safe place for children to spend time outside of home and school, was founded as the Dashaway Club in Hartford 148 years ago. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: April 29, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/neighborhoods/htfd_courant_042908.asp

Hartford's Colt Complex At Crucial Turning Point Travelers have sped through Hartford past the vacant windows of the decaying Colt firearms armory with little to distract them for nearly 20 years, but now there are signs of life. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: July 23, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_072312.asp

Hartford's Forlorn Soldier To Get A Makeover After 45 years, the old Civil War soldier was relieved of his post recently. Braced, wrapped tightly in plastic, he was hoisted onto a flatbed and taken away for much-needed rest and recovery. Since 1968, his face, hands and rifle already long gone, the 8˝-foot brownstone figure stood guard at a quiet, grassy corner of Airport Road. He had survived floods, relocations, vandalism and decades of neglect through a lifetime estimated at 144 to 147 years. Over the coming weeks, the "Forlorn Soldier," as he has come to be known in recent years, will be under the care of monument conservator Francis Miller at his Hamden studio. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: July 19, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_071913.asp

Hartford's Historical Allure Coming Into Focus Hartford's efforts to embrace its storied past and present it to the world advanced considerably in November 2012. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: November 23, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_112312.asp

Hartford's Homeless Remembered In Death Recently, advocates and supporters came to Charter Oak Cultural Center for a National Homeless Persons' Day memorial. Since 1990, on the shortest day (and longest night), advocates and others have stopped to remember the people who didn't make it through the year and died homeless or from symptoms of homelessness, such as unmet medical needs. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: December 25, 2011
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_122511_1.asp

Hartford's Jimmy Francoline, 91, Recalls His Baseball Glory Days Jimmy Francoline recalls being a member of the Hartford Bees in 1943 during the time when many minor leagues shut down because of World War II. The next year, the Bees were known as the Laurels, and they proved to be one of the greatest minor league teams ever assembled. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: May 29, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/parks/htfd_courant_052909.asp

Hartford's Long-Planned African American Cultural Center Gets $1 Million State Grant The John E. Rogers African American cultural center planned for the long-abandoned Northwest School building has gotten a huge boost with the approval of a $1 million state grant. The money, approved by the State Bond Commission earlier this month. will be used to help renovate the old school on Albany Avenue, which was built in 1891. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: June 15, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_061512.asp

Hartford's New Stevens Walk Is A Moving Poem The Wallace Stevens Walk, which traces Stevens' daily journey from home to work, traces a 2.4-mile route marked by 13 knee-high granite markers, each with a stanza of Mr. Stevens' well-known poem "Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Blackbird." It has taken 10 years to raise more than $140,000 for the memorial and get the necessary permits and permissions. Other than one large grant from The Hartford, the money has come "in dribs and drabs," said Ms. Palm. But help came from lawyers and architects, the city librarian and the public works director. Local poets and some nationally known poets helped or contributed. They were inspired by a great idea. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: May 23, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/artsandculture/htfd_courant_052309.asp

Hartford's New Time Machine Tom Condon discusses the new exhibit at the Old State House, "History Is All Around Us." Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: September 17, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/History/htfd_courant_091706.asp

Hartford's Old North Cemetery On The Rebound Not too long ago, an invitation to take a walk through Old North Cemetery with noted historian William Hosley meant one thing: that someone wanted to point out how the landmark resting place of some of the City's earliest captains of industry, politics and architecture had fallen into disrepair. But, that neglect will end with the City's commitment of $1.25 million over the next 10 years to restore the cemetery and "sculpture park" to its former glory. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: November 21, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_112112.asp

Hartford's Past Gets A Hand From Its Future A house from Hartford's past, which formerly sat closed and largely unnoticed while the area around it decayed, is poised to make a comeback — along with the neighborhood. The Isham-Terry House, a stone's throw north of I-84 on High Street, will reopen to the public Saturday for tours for the first time since 2006. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: June 28, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_062812.asp

Hartford's Past: Amateur Historian Shares Memories of State Theater Calvin Vinick's father was a master cabinetmaker in downtown Hartford who restored antiques for Connecticut's bold-faced names. He also obliged the managers of the nearby State Theater by putting posters in his shop window that advertised upcoming acts. Vinick recently shared some of his scrapbooks with the Courant. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: January 03, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_010312.asp

Hartford's Stowe Featured In The Abolitionists Harriet Beecher Stowe was not a member of anti-slavery organizations in the 1830s and 1840s. She opposed slavery, and was enraged by the fugitive slave law, but she wasn't an activist. So it must have come as quite a surprise in 1852 when "Uncle Tom's Cabin" was published and Stowe suddenly became the most famous abolitionist in the country. Her fame increased when it was adapted into a stage play, which delivered the humanitarian message to people who could not read. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: January 05, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_010513.asp

Hartford's Webster Theatre, State's Biggest Rock Club, Sold To MassConcerts More than 70 years of family ownership has ended with the sale of the Webster Theatre in Hartford to a Massachusetts concert promoter. Justine Robertson, whose family built the Barry Square movie house in 1937, has sold the venue for an undisclosed price to John Peters, who takes control of the 1,250-capacity rock club, the largest in Connecticut. The purchase price was not disclosed. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: March 18, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/economicdevelopment/htfd_courant_031809.asp

Hartford’s Constitution Plaza: Mistake Or Something Else? Hartford’s Constitution Plaza has often been reviled as a mistake that erased an entire, ethnically diverse neighborhood, creating a raised plaza isolated from the rest of downtown. But an historian recently urged moderation in assessing the legacy of the 1960s Urban Renewal redevelopment, even as a large chunk of the area has now fallen into foreclosure. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: August 01, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/downtowndevelopment/htfd_courant_080112.asp

He Did So Much For The Kids In Hartford When the Hartford Police Department was headquartered in an old school on Morgan Street 50 years ago, kids always flocked around Officer Jack Bordieri. Bordieri, a Hartford native, died on June 23, 2009 at age 76. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: July 05, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_070509.asp

He Gave Many A Voice William R. Hales, the longtime publisher of the Hartford Inquirer and an icon in the city's black community, died on January 10, 2007. He was 73. Hales founded the Inquirer in the mid-1970s, and for the next three decades it gave voice to black perspectives on local issues. Leaders of the city's African American community remembered him as a benevolent man who was passionate about his community. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: January 12, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/History/htfd_courant_011207.asp

He Shaped Hartford's Landscape Jacob Weidenmann was a significant influence on what we can call the face of Hartford, but in all likelihood, you've never heard of him. Weidenmann essentially designed Bushnell Park in Hartford. A new book about his life written by a professor emeritus of landscape architecture at the University of Connecticut has recently been published. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: October 16, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/parks/htfd_courant_101607.asp

He Truly Connected Johnny Duke's life spanned 81 years of Hartford history, some of it now swept away by time and bulldozers - places like Russell and Kennedy streets in the North End, where he grew up in tenement housing, and the Bellevue Square housing project, where he started a basement boxing club that became a sanctuary for disadvantaged kids. But much of what Duke championed during his mythic life remains as solid as one of his sledgehammer punches, mourners recalled recently at a funeral service that represented a who's who of the city and its environs. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: March 9, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/History/htfd_courant_030906.asp

Helped Shape The University Of Hartford David Komisar helped transform Hillyer College into the University of Hartford and develop it into a respected residential institution that draws 7,400 students from 45 states and 49 countries. He was the school's longest-serving chief academic officer, and when he retired, he was named provost emeritus. Komisar, a former resident of West Hartford, died on March 19, 2013. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: April 07, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/education/htfd_courant_040713.asp

Helping Visitors 'Connect the Dots' Two teachers retired from Hartford Public Schools have started Sunshine Tours. They are now telling the stories of Hartford and showing off its historic sites.Tours start at the Connecticut Convention Center and stop at the Old State House, the Ancient Burying Ground, the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art and the Butler-McCook House and Garden, while weaving a narrative that touches on Native Americans, Dutch traders, and people such as Thomas Hooker, Samuel Colt, and J.P. Morgan. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: October 24, 2005
Document Link: /issues/documents/DowntownDevelopment/htfd_courant_102405.asp

Herb's Sport Shop Leaving City For the first time since it opened in 1959, Herb's Sport Shop no longer has a Hartford storefront. Andrew Sheintop, son of the late Herb Sheintop, who opened the original sporting goods store, said that his business has changed over time from walk-in retail to mostly team, institutional, and league business. As a result, Herb's needed more space, and in Bristol - where his new store just opened this week - he's got three times as much of it. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: August 4, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/DowntownDevelopment/htfd_courant_080406.asp

Hiding The Royal Charter Connecticut is celebrating the 375th anniversary of its founding with special events all year. This is one of an occasional series looking back at the earliest chapters in the state's history. British officials came to Connecticut in 1687 on a search for a document. They left without it. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: August 23, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_082310.asp

Historian Hosley To Lead Bicyclists Along Trail Of Hartford's Significant Sites William Hosley of Enfield, a cultural resources consultant with a decades-long professional interest in the city of Hartford's history, led the way. This was the first stop in a trial run of a Hosley pet project that's in the works — a bicycle tour of Hartford historic sites. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: April 03, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_040310.asp

Historic Agency Doing The Job The city of Hartford has a marvelous trove of 19th- and early 20th-century architecture, buildings that cannot be found in the suburbs or in many other parts of the country. Sadly, too many of Hartford's historic buildings have been lost and were continuing to be taken down until the city passed a historic preservation ordinance and created a historic properties preservation commission six years ago. It is thus imperative that the commission stay in business. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: August 24, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_082412.asp

Historic Building In Downtown Hartford Gets A Face Lift A century ago, a rather plain brick storefront at the corner of Asylum and Trumbull streets in downtown Hartford was dressed up with a decorative, two-story, cast-iron storefront. Now the historic building, owned by the same family since it was built in 1850s and passed down through seven generations, is recapturing some of that old magic. The Seymour family and its new tenant, Sovereign Bank, are finishing up a $4.6 million renovation of the four-story building at 115 Asylum St. that is at the center of what many consider to be the heart of downtown. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: July 15, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_071508.asp

Historic Buildings Make Affordable Homes The first homes built on Zion and York Streets in Frog Hollow were within walking distance of nearby factories such as Pope Manufacturing and Pratt & Whitney. The workers who lived there were reasonably well-off, but horses and buggies were out of their price range. That was 1905. The factories have closed since then, and many of the century-old houses on Zion and York Streets have become blighted and been boarded up. But thanks to a joint effort of the state's Department of Economic and Community Development, the city and some local developers, the Frog Hollow historic houses are seeing new life. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: August 2, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/Housing/htfd_courant_080206.asp

Historic Documents Up For Bidding An recent online auction featured documents signed by the four Connecticut men who signed the Declaration of Independence and an acorn carved from a piece of wood from the Charter Oak, the tree where Connecticut's constitutional charter was hidden in 1687 to prevent its confiscation by the British. RR Auction of New Hampshire is the auctioneer. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: February 10, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_021012.asp

Historic Error When Connecticut Historical Society officials announced recently that the Old State House was in financial trouble, their predicament could be traced back to a 2003 economic feasibility report prepared by Massachusetts-based ConsultEcon. Published by The Hartford Business Journal ; Publication Date: March 1, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/History/hbj_030107.asp

Historic Homes To Get $3.4 Million Renovation Five boarded-up, 19th-century homes on Belden Street in Hartford's North End will be restored beginning in May. The project aims to revive both the historic homes and the block itself - one that is now a frequent stop for city police fighting drugs and crime. Financing for the project will be funded by the estimated $1.1 million in sales when the units are completed, plus $2.2 million from "gap financing" - grant money from various state and local agencies and nonprofits, including the state Department of Economic Development, the Connecticut Housing Investment Fund, the Capital City Economic Development Authority and the city. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: April 11, 2005
Document Link: /issues/documents/housing/htfd_courant_041105.asp

Historic Homes To Get $3.4 Million Renovation Five boarded-up, 19th-century homes on Belden Street in Hartford's North End will be restored beginning in May. The project aims to revive both the historic homes and the block itself - one that is now a frequent stop for city police fighting drugs and crime. Financing for the project will be funded by the estimated $1.1 million in sales when the units are completed, plus $2.2 million from "gap financing" - grant money from various state and local agencies and nonprofits, including the state Department of Economic Development, the Connecticut Housing Investment Fund, the Capital City Economic Development Authority and the city. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: April 11, 2005
Document Link: /issues/documents/housing/htfd_courant_041105.asp

Historic Rain of Parks Photos At Hartford Public Library Rain and parks are usually incongruent words. If there is rain, then your day at the park is usually ruined. But the large-scale exhibit "The Rain of Parks" at Hartford Public Library refers to the term used to describe the unified system of parks that ringed the city in the early 20th century. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: August 28, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/parks/htfd_courant_082810.asp

Historic South Church Endures As a downtown church, with a membership of about 275 families, South Church confronts the challenge of shifting population and demographics. South Church currently is led by interim ministers, the Rev. Ralph Lord Roy and the Rev. Melanie Enfield, and is conducting a national search for a new pastor. Church leaders are also hopeful that the Adriaen's Landing project could bring new people to the city. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: February 19, 2005
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_021905.asp

History Detectives Comes To Hartford For Investigation Elyse Luray, an appraiser, licensed auctioneer and historian of popular culture, from the PBS television show “History Detectives” came to the Connecticut State Library in Hartford recently. She was investigating a Connecticut story about Jewish settlements at the turn of the last century. A homeowner had looked at a deed and wondered why there were so many residents of apparent Eastern European descent in a short period of time. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: June 30, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_063008.asp

History Out Of Prints From a walkup in a downtown Hartford building long gone, the Kellogg Brothers provided a window into Victorian America. Like Currier & Ives in New York, the Hartford siblings provided a graphic depiction of 19th-century life — its manners, its fashions, its hopes and its history. In roughly a 50-year span from 1830 to 1880, the Kelloggs churned out lithographs for all occasions. More than 1,000 are in the collection of the Connecticut Historical Society and now, 180 years after the firm began, two new major projects from the historical society display their work. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: February 07, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/artsandculture/htfd_courant_020710.asp

History Set In Stone Susan Campbell reviews a handful of the Hartford's more notable memorials and statues, some because they're rare, some because they're beautiful. and some because they're both. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: September 06, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_090607.asp

Hog River Journal Hartford and the region's magazine of history, culture, and the arts. Through stories and images Hog River Journal explores the region's cultural heritage with the aim of revealing connections between the past, present, and future. Published Quarterly. Published by Hartford Public Library ; Publication Date: 2004
Document Link: /Issues/wsd/History/wsd_2004.asp

Hold The Wrecking Ball This Courant editorial expresses the opinion that The Hartford's plan to buy the 12-acre former MassMutual property that adjoins its own campus in the city's Asylum Hill neighborhood is good news. That the plan includes the demolition of the Georgian Revival office building on the site, built as the home office for the Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance Co. in 1926, is not good news. The Hartford should make every effort to preserve at least the original part of this handsome structure. It's unfortunate that even a stellar corporate citizen like The Hartford thinks first of demolition. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: December 20, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/neighborhoods/htfd_courant_122007.asp

Holding The Family Together Helen Ubińas writes about Mattie Laird’s effort to keep her family together in her home on Garden Street in Hartford over the last 40 years. The changes on the street eventually crept their way into the house until what happened outside mirrored their family. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: August 06, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/neighborhoods/htfd_courant_080609.asp

Honoring Veterans An estimated 25,000 spectators lined the parade route along Trinity, Asylum and Main streets in Hartford, to watch a record 3,500 marchers for the 2006 Connecticut Veterans Day Parade. The parade stretched so long that the first marchers completed the route before the last marchers stepped off. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: November 6, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/History/htfd_courant_110606.asp

Hope For Homeownership On One Hartford Street The two apartment buildings at the corner of Wolcott and Ward streets were built when Abraham Lincoln occupied the White House, but up until a year ago, the properties in Frog Hollow also appeared headed for the history books. Southside Institutions Neighborhood Alliance recently showcased a $1 million rehabilitation of the two buildings — now converted to four, two-family houses that will be sold to first-time home buyers. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: June 20, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/housing/htfd_courant_062013.asp

Hope Sprouting Beneath Lonely Hartford Elm The tree is easily recognized from I-84, standing in splendid isolation, surrounded by parking lots. This barren landscape also contains the once-proud Italianate style Isham-Terry House and the blown-out shell of the former Henry Barnard School. The great tree, called the High Street Elm, is a focal point in the derelict area in Hartford's center city north of the highway, an urban archaeological site left by the planners of the 1960s. Yet it is a great tree. It could be a symbol of hope. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: February 07, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_020710.asp

Hopeful and Helpful In this opinion piece, the author reviews the history of faith-based assistance to immigrants and refugees in Connecticut. Mission churches — then and now — are often as much social work settlement houses as centers of spirituality. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: May 24, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/faithcommunity/htfd_courant_052409.asp

House Holds Abe Giles Tribute The state House of Representatives paused during a recent legislative activity to praise Abraham L. Giles, the eight-term House member and longtime Democratic power in Hartford's North End who died at 84 on March 26. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: May 27, 2011
Document Link: /issues/documents/government/htfd_courant_052711.asp

House Passes Funding For Harriet Beecher Stowe Center U.S. Rep. John Larson says the House of Representatives has passed $150,000 "to preserve the home and historical collections at the Harriet Beecher Stowe Center." Published by Hartford Cityline, The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: October 29, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/cityline_102909.asp

How Authentic Can You Get? Earlier this month, the National Park System Advisory Board's Landmarks Committee rejected the nomination of Hartford's Colt complex to become a National Historic Landmark. The committee raised no objections to the historical significance of the Colt buildings. The committee rejected the Colt nomination because members felt that the building did not possess the "high degree of integrity" needed for landmark status. They specifically objected to the ongoing rehabilitation, which will subdivide much of the complex's interior space into residential units. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: October 22, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/History/htfd_courant_102206.asp

How Hubbard Street Turned Into Sisson Avenue Who is Sisson Avenue in Hartford named for? Sisson Avenue is named for Albert Lee Sisson, born Nov. 8, 1817, in Bloomfield. He built the Sisson Block at the corner of Main and Sheldon streets, where he operated a meat market for several years. The building stood near the old stone bridge that crossed the Park River. Now, the Hartford Public Library sits east of the bridge and over the Whitehead Highway, under which the Park River still flows. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: March 7, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/History/htfd_courant_030707.asp

How the Lions Came to City Hall The history of the two life size marble lions that guard the Arch Street entrance to City Hall is revealed. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: April 24, 2005
Document Link: /issues/documents/government/htfd_courant_042405.asp

How The Stockbroker Tudors Made A Neighborhood In southwest Hartford some fancy houses, upscale, side-by-side duplexes, look gloriously out of place in the context of the housing in adjacent neighborhoods. Architects call them Stockbroker Tudors, a fad in the 1920s meant to evoke British grandeur, even on the two-family level. Zion Street, opposite Trinity's south Summit Street entrance, has them with timbers and slate roofs still intact. But most of the others were more modest versions, without timbers, just with Tudor roof lines and unadorned facades. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: October 31, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/neighborhoods/htfd_courant_103110.asp

How The Wilde Was Won The recent death of the great pro-urban thinker and city advocate Jane Jacobs coincided with the news of CIGNA HealthCare's decision to save the Wilde Building. The Wilde Building is an architectural landmark of national and international significance, eligible for listing on the National Register of Historic Places. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: May 21, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_052106.asp

HPHS's Rich Past Enriches The Present At Hartford Public High, the country's second-oldest public high school history has been collected in a new school museum by archivist R.J. Luke Williams. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: October 10, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/education/htfd_courant_101007.asp

Hundreds Dedicate Circus Fire Memorial On the 61st anniversary of the worst fire in the state's history, several hundred people attended a dedication ceremony of the Hartford Circus Fire Memorial. The memorial, located in a field behind the Fred D. Wish Elementary school in North Hartford, was erected on the site of the disaster. The dedication ceremony was the culmination of four years of work by the Hartford Circus Fire Memorial Foundation's members who raised about $125,000 and helped design the monument. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: July 7, 2005
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_070705.asp

I. Charles: Past and Present I. Charles Mathews has his own Sept. 11. On Sept. 11, 1991, his political career crashed when the nominated Democratic Town Committee City Council slate he led as Deputy Mayor with mayoral candidate Robert Jackson suffered an electoral defeat at the hands of petitioning-candidate Mayor Carrie Saxon-Perry and her untested council team. Published by The Hartford News ; Publication Date: July 18, 2007
Document Link: /Issues/Documents/Government/htfd_news_071807_b.asp

Iconic American Painting In Hartford If you want an Independence Day experience you'll never forget, go to Hartford's superb Wadsworth Atheneum and look at a national treasure that should make your eyes water. It's the "Declaration of Independence, July 4, 1776," the most important painting in a series commissioned by Congress to hang in the Capitol rotunda Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: July 04, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_070409.asp

In A World Of Past And Present Connecticut Historical Society Museum and the Old State House have developed a new exhibit, "History Is All Around Us." It is a brightly colored, knickknack filled, multimedia look at how history is part of everyday life. It is part of an effort to make the Old State House, a more approachable downtown landmark, and expresses the idea that visitors should get history at a glance. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: September 1, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/History/htfd_courant_090106.asp

In Its 100th Year, Conning Stresses Diversification A hundred years ago, William Smith Conning, office manager at investment firm Hornblower & Weeks, and his colleague William C. Goeben set out on their own and founded W.S. Conning & Co. in Hartford. But even he might not have predicted that someday, one of his CEOs in the future would have a bilingual calling card in Chinese. Today, Woody E. Bradford is heading Conning's first expansion in Asia, a strategy put in place by predecessor Salvatore Correnti, now vice chairman and member of the board. Published by The Hartford Business Journal ; Publication Date: December 17, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/hbj_121712.asp

In Memory: Hipolito Cuevas, 1966 – 2010 Hipolito Cuevas, one of Connecticut’s best know Spanish-language radio personalities, died on July 7, 2010, from complications due to diabetes. He was 44. Published by The Hartford News ; Publication Date: July 22, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/neighborhoods/htfd_news_072210_1.asp

In Need Of Salvation Tom Condon writes that as with many historic downtown churches, Center Church on Main Street in Hartford has grown fragile and more difficult to maintain over the centuries. This has happened in many cases as congregations have lost members to age or the suburbs, leaving fewer people to meet a greater need. Virtually all of these historic churches have supported themselves over the years with minimal government help, usually in the form of property tax exemptions. Are the buildings important enough to the broader community to warrant greater public investment? In many European countries, historic churches or cathedrals are maintained with government support. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: November 12, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/FaithCommunity/htfd_courant_111206.asp

Ingenuity On Display This Courant editorial reviews a new permanent exhibit at the Old State House. It is just what the downtown Hartford landmark needed to rejuvenate it as a destination spot. The attraction puts the "story" back into history and the past into proper context. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: September 14, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/History/htfd_courant_091406.asp

Insurer Puts Twain Centennial In Business Thanks in large part to The Hartford Financial Service Group, Mark Twain will get the celebration he deserves. April 21, 2010, is the 100th anniversary of the death of Samuel Clemens, aka Mark Twain, the great writer and social critic who lived and wrote many of his greatest works in Hartford. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: December 05, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/literacy/htfd_courant_120509.asp

Inventive Hartford Wins Smithsonian Recognition An exhibit under development at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of American History — an exhibit that will include Hartford — is particularly intriguing. The exhibit, being prepared under the auspices of the Smithsonian's Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation, is titled "Places of Invention” and examines why, over the course of U.S. history, certain cities or regions became hotbeds of innovation and invention. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: July 29, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_072912.asp

It's Arch Vs. Autos The city's historic Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Arch was damaged again recently when a motorist hit the structure. The crash knocked out a sizable section of the brownstone bridge leading up to the arch on its north side. The sixth such accident in two years is frustrating to protectors of the arch. But its timing is fortuitous. It comes just as the Bushnell Park Foundation is poised to approve a major street redesign plan aimed at discouraging speeding and reckless driving around the arch. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: December 31, 2005
Document Link: /issues/documents/Parks/htfd_courant_123105.asp

It's Clothes-ing Time After 34 years as a tailor to Hartford's elite, Alvin Bell is finally hanging it all up. Bell recently closed the doors to his 30 State House Square shop - where he's been since 1994 – and is retiring to Jamaica. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: June 1, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/DowntownDevelopment/htfd_courant_060107_a.asp

It's Time For Us To Help Save The Lyric Helen Ubińas writes that the Lyric lives – at least so far. After the rear portion of the former Lyric Theater on Broad Street was demolished recently, the question remained: What will become of the rest of the historic building? As she said in her column, the demolition of the Broad Street portion was unfortunate. But taking down the Park Street building would be horrendous loss. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: April 06, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_040610.asp

It’s Official, Bob Steele St In Hartford Politicians, fans, insurance execs, media types and family and friends were at the corner of Prospect and Grove, I mean Bob Steele Street, today to rename the road after the late, beloved, iconic radio broadcaster Bob Steele. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: January 04, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_010413.asp

James K. Grant Among Honorees Cited By Preservation Alliance James K. Grant was recently honored for his lifetime achievement in historic preservation at the Hartford Preservation Alliance's awards ceremony. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: May 21, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_052110.asp

James Kinsella, Former Hartford Mayor, Probate Judge, Dies At 88 James H. Kinsella, a former City mayor, councilman and probate judge, died on October 8, 2012. He was 88. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: October 10, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/government/htfd_courant_101012.asp

Jane E. Hart Was The Bubble In The Champagne For generations, Jane Hart was one of Hartford's best-known dancers, a beautiful woman who exuded grace, glitter and glamour. She grew up in the South End and began taking dancing lessons when she was about 8. She studied at the Florence Greenland Dance Studio and soon opened her own successful studio, where she taught until she had a stroke at 81. She died on Feb. 1, 2009. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: March 01, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_030109.asp

Jazz: The Fine Art Of Art Fine Although he never played a note in public and shunned the limelight, Art Fine, a founder of the Hartford Jazz Society, was for many decades one of the most influential, behind-the-scenes shakers-and-doers on the Hartford jazz scene. A vital, invaluable presence in the music until slowed down by failing health in recent years, Fine died on December 29, 2007, at his home in Bloomfield, surrounded by loved ones. He was 96. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: January 04, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/artsandculture/htfd_courant_010408.asp

John B. O'Connell Was Hartford's Mr. Republican John B. O'Connell had a major impact on Hartford government, and will be dearly missed. Mr. O'Connell, who died on September 21, 2011 at 65. He was an anomaly, a conservative Republican of Irish descent in a city that was heavily Democratic and dominated by other ethnic groups. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: September 22, 2011
Document Link: /issues/documents/government/htfd_courant_092211.asp

John Dollard: An Urban Planner Who Put His Stamp On Hartford John "Jack" Dollard was a city planner, an architect and activist whose work is seen all around Hartford. He also was a talented artist. Dollard, born July 27, 1929, died June 22, 2012 of a heart attack in Oaxaca, Mexico. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: July 21, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_072112.asp

Katharine Hepburn Was Always A Hartford Booster Hartford never had a poster girl quite like Katharine Hepburn. From the moment that she struck it big, Hepburn served as the city's head cheerleader, generous philanthropist and cultural icon. She never, ever forgot her roots on Hawthorn Street. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: April 16, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_041608.asp

Keeping The City's Parlor Open Nearly 100 years ago, when Hartford officials announced they would build a new city hall and leave the Old State House, there were rumors that the building would be torn down. But saving a historic building from the wrecking ball is only the first step. The State House's current dilemma reminds us that there are two more vital challenges: what to do with the building, and on whose shilling. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: March 11, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/artsandculture/htfd_courant_031107_b.asp

Keeping The Club The West Indian Social Club in Hartford recently celebrated its 60th anniversary. Published by The Hartford Advocate ; Publication Date: April 27, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/neighborhoods/htfd_advocate_042710.asp

Kinsella's Probate Imbroglio Shouldn't Obscure Many Contributions It would be unfortunate if James H. Kinsella is remembered for nothing more than a single controversy. Mr. Kinsella, who died this week at 88, did a great deal for Hartford over his long life. Mr. Kinsella, a lawyer, was elected a councilman and deputy mayor of Hartford in 1953 and mayor in 1957. He was elected judge of probate in 1961. He resigned, rather than be impeached, over a legal matter. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: October 10, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/government/htfd_courant_101012_1.asp

Knowing History Makes People Feel At Home Here Despite a surge of initiatives from Gov. Dannel P. Malloy, the state's economy continues to suffer. So here’s another economic development idea — how about if we require the teaching of Connecticut history in our schools? Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: September 13, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/economicdevelopment/htfd_courant_091312.asp

Lament For The Muni The Main Street building in Hartford that housed the fabled Municipal Cafeteria is now home to a Dunkin' Donuts. The tin roof, wooden booths and classic photographs of Hartford have been replaced by a standard, off-white box with the chain's orange and red trimmings. The feeling of openness, history, warmth - all gone. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: January 30, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/DowntownDevelopment/htfd_courant_013006.asp

Landmark Will Get Second Look The effort to get historic landmark status for the Colt Gateway complex got a second life recently, after its rejection unleashed a flood of outrage from local, state and federal officials. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: December 16, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/Housing/htfd_courant_121606.asp

Large, Dramatic Ceiling Mural Is Hall's Crowning Glory: Since You Asked: The Bushnell The 2,800-seat Horace Bushnell Memorial Hall opened Jan. 13, 1930. Its magnificent ceiling mural was the work of renowned muralist and painter Barry Faulkner of New York City. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: October 24, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/artsandculture/htfd_courant_102407.asp

Last Hartford-Made Colt To Go On Sale In Vegas The last Colt handgun made in the city of Hartford went on sale in Las Vegas recently in the first phase of what may be the largest auction of firearms made by the legendary Connecticut gunmaker. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: January 15, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_011509.asp

Last Vestige Of Another Era The 150-year-old brownstone church building on Market Street is the last holdout of pre-Constitution Plaza-era buildings from the defunct Front Street neighborhood of the old East Side. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: February 6, 2005
Document Link: /issues/documents/faithcommunity/htfd_courant_020605.asp

Lawsuits Against Lance Robbins Still Being Pursued Hartford attorneys for Frank Gamwell, the California developer pursuing a $29 million fraud judgment against Coltsville developer Lance Robbins, have kept alive a related lawsuit accusing Robbins of racketeering by filing the action in federal court. Published by The Hartford Advocate ; Publication Date: July 13, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/downtowndevelopment/htfd_advocate_071310.asp

Legendary Hartford Bandleader Paul Landerman Dies Paul Landerman, a legendary Hartford bandleader, trombonist and top entertainment-booking agent for many decades, died September 19, 2008 at the Hebrew Home and Hospital in West Hartford. He was 92. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: September 20, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/artsandculture/htfd_courant_092008.asp

Let's Root Our Icons In City Soil Stan Simpson suggests that Hartford can do better capitalizing on the accomplishments of its own. While newcomers to the city associate it with the names Mark Twain, Katharine Hepburn, or maybe gun master Samuel Colt, Hartford should also recognize Willie Pep, the featherweight prize fighter, and Jackie McLean, the great alto saxophone player. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: November 25, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/History/htfd_courant_112506.asp

Likable, Effective City Clerk Will Be Sorely Missed Dan Carey was one of the finest public servants to work in Hartford government in living memory. Mr. Carey, 51, Hartford's city clerk since 1993, was found dead in his home September 11, 2009 in the city's South End. He had been ill with a pancreatic disorder. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: September 12, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/government/htfd_courant_091209_2.asp

Listen to Storytellers, Learn About the West End of the Past, Present & Future The West End has many residents who have lived there for decades. As part of Jane’s Walk, a walking conversation concerning urban neighborhoods around the world, storytellers and historians were available recently at community locations to offer stories about the neighborhood. Published by The Hartford News ; Publication Date: October 07, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_news_100710.asp

Long Walk Restored As Trinity's Showpiece Long Walk, Trinity College's oldest and most celebrated building, has been restored. The masonry walls have been strengthened and re-pointed, its slate roof and ridge tiles replaced, new copper flashings installed, and its old windows restored or replaced with new cast iron ones modeled on the originals. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: September 07, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/education/htfd_courant_090708_1.asp

Longtime Hartford Educator Vernal Davis Dies At 74 Vernal Paul Davis, a longtime educator in Hartford who devoted his life to helping children, died Sunday, January 25, 2009. He was 74. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: January 30, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/education/htfd_courant_013009.asp

Looking Back and Ahead with Adriaen One of the first thoughts one has when you say “Adriaen’s Landing” is, who was Adriaen and why is it the name of the newest commercial, entertainment and convention district in the capital city. That’s a good question and the answer is a great story reflecting much of Greater Hartford’s history. Published by The Hartford News ; Publication Date: February 18, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/downtowndevelopment/htfd_news_021810_1.asp

Looking Up Northside Institutions Neighborhood Alliance, founded in 2003 to revive the city's Asylum Hill neighborhood, and known by its acronym NINA, is saving Sigourney Square. NINA recently acquired a decaying structure, a “perfect six,” on Atwood Street at a tax lien sale. The NINA folks, with help from the city and the Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation, are saving the facade and rebuilding the rest of the building as two side-by-side townhouses, a "perfect two," if you will. The Atwood Street building is one of a dozen that NINA either has renovated, or is in the process of doing so, in just the past four years. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: April 11, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/neighborhoods/htfd_courant_041110.asp

Lost In Hartford's Old North Cemetery In this article, the author writes of the thrill of finding the graves of her great-grandparents. She located them in 2003, but today can no longer find the stones. The cemetery is un-mown and stones are broken and piled in heaps. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: June 27, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_062710.asp

Lost In The Coliseum Bill Katz, an art consultant, expresses the opinion that public art projects should be, by definition, available to the public. They should be in a place where all can enjoy them. Hartford has two public works of art that were born in much controversy, but are now accessible only to people who buy tickets for hockey or basketball games. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: October 28, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/artsandculture/htfd_courant_102807_1.asp

Lozada Park to Be Transformed Six years ago, a group of 13 older adults participating in Leadership Greater Hartford’s Third Age Initiative formed a team committed to developing a project that would enhance the quality of life in a Hartford neighborhood. This group, known as the “Neighborhood Gang,” included residents of many Greater Hartford communities. They discovered a tiny “pocket park” in the Clay Hill neighborhood long abandoned and ignored. The Neighborhood Gang began working to transform this large, vacant lot into a center for the neighborhood to gather safely, for children to play and for community to take root. Groundbreaking is scheduled for early in the summer of 2008, and ribbon cutting to open the transformed Lozada Park is scheduled for May, 2009. Published by The Hartford News ; Publication Date: June 26, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_news_062608.asp

Magic On The Court He was the son of Irish immigrants who lived in the city's Blue Hills neighborhood when it was a bit of an Irish enclave. He was blessed with lightning speed and big, quick hands. He was a born basketball star, at his best when the game was close. Johnny Egan, one of Hartford's greatest athletes, was honored recently by his alma mater, Providence College. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: March 05, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_030509.asp

Major Hartford Synagogues A listing of Hartford's historic synagogues. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: February 19, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/FaithCommunity/htfd_courant_021906_a.asp

Make Colt The Collegiate Armory Even with its National Historic Site designation all but assured, the rejuvenation of the Colt armory, a prominent landmark in Hartford since the mid-19th century, appears to have stalled. This is not necessarily bad. It offers a chance to change the mix, with an eye toward the armory's historic role in the city. Bringing a center of higher education to Coltsville would return the armory to its roots and give it a new important role in the 21st century. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: December 30, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/education/htfd_courant_123007.asp

Making Room for History Community leaders and organizations are renovating the annex of Hartford's old Northwest School into a new home for the John E. Rogers African American Cultural Center. The museum is expected to cost $3.5 million and will house African American cultural collections and meeting space for community groups. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: May 20, 2005
Document Link: /issues/documents/artsandculture/htfd_courant_052005.asp

Malcolm X Day Set For Saturday At Hartford Public Library Muhammad Ansari was 25 when he sat for coffee with the black nationalist leader of his generation. It was 1963 and Malcolm X had come to Hartford to speak at the Bushnell. Fifty years after that Hartford visit, the Consciousness Coalition, a group of social activists in the city, held its first annual Malcolm X Day recently at the downtown Hartford Public Library. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: May 15, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_051513.asp

Malloy: Inspiration In State's Proud Past What a refreshing change it will be to have a governor who sees the value of Connecticut's history and can speak in poetry as well as prose. Gov. Dannel P. Malloy dedicated almost one-third of his inaugural speech to Connecticut history — and not just the obvious stuff. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: January 09, 2011
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_010911.asp

Man Of The Cloth Finally Embraced Goodness The poor have always been with us, and by 1890, the Rev. John James McCook, respected rector at St. John's Episcopal Church in East Hartford and resident of a graceful home on Hartford's Main Street, had had enough of the homeless. He was angry that the city had set aside $40,000 for "outdoor alms," or money for the homeless. But with experience, his attitude changed. The more homeless men he met, the less sure he was of his original opinion. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: December 16, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_121607.asp

Maria C. Sánchez A native of Comerío, Puerto Rico, María Sánchez came to Hartford in 1953. She was a community activist until the last days of her life and recognized as the godmother of the Puerto Rican and Hispanic community. María co-founded the Puerto Rican Parade organization. Published by The Hartford News ; Publication Date: May 30, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_news_053013.asp

Mark Twain Autobiography: It's a Hit; Sold Out At Most Stores No one should confuse Mark Twain with Tickle Me Elmo, but the new autobiography by Hartford's literary lion has become this year's hard-to-get Christmas gift. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: November 24, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_112410.asp

Mark Twain Commemorative Coin Coming in 2016? The U.S. House of Representatives overwhelmingly passed a bill that would require the Treasury Department to issue Mark Twain gold and silver commemorative coins in 2016, with revenue from the sales to benefit the Mark Twain House and Museum in Hartford and three other nonprofit groups. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: April 19, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/artsandculture/htfd_courant_041912.asp

Mark Twain Gets His Own Coin Mark Twain is getting his own coin – and it could be worth more than $1 million to the Mark Twain House and Museum in Hartford. The House of Representatives gave final approval to the Mark Twain coin legislation recently and President Obama is expected to sign the legislation so sales can begin by January of 2016. The $5 gold and $1 silver coins will be legal tender, though collectors are the primary market for the new money. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: November 16, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_111612.asp

Mark Twain Gets Own Coins It's official: The Mark Twain silver dollar is coming. A commemorative $5 gold coin also will be minted for sale in 2016, now that President Barack Obama has signed into law legislation creating the coins. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: December 07, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_120712.asp

Mark Twain House Executive Director Resigning Jeff Nichols, executive director of the Mark Twain House & Museum, is resigning his position with the Hartford landmark. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: June 29, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_062912_1.asp

Mark Twain House To Show Films About Blacks In America Mark Twain House & Museum in Hartford recently opened "Hateful Things," an exhibit of racist memorabilia, as part of the "Race, Rage & Redemption" series. As a complement, the Twain House showed a series of films about the black experience in America, both bad and good. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: March 05, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/artsandculture/htfd_courant_030512.asp

Mark Twain Still Shocks Legions of Mark Twain fans are in for a special treat this fall when the first of three volumes of his autobiography are published, 100 years after his death. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: September 14, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_091410.asp

Marketing Should Celebrate What Makes It Special Hartford matters. A strong, resonant capital city can telegraph the state's image and competitiveness nationwide. It matters because, despite negatives that warrant serious and coherent attention, Hartford's positives are still genuinely breathtaking. Marketing should focus on Hartford’s strengths captured in the following words: Twain, Colt, Bushnell, Atheneum, attractions, historic, iQuilt. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: August 07, 2011
Document Link: /issues/documents/economicdevelopment/htfd_courant_080711_1.asp

Marking The Passing Of Two Hartford Stalwarts Hartford lost two great and good people recently. Alan E. Green was raised in the city's Rice Heights housing project, at a time when the projects were wholesome and safe neighborhoods. The inimitable Jack Dollard was an architect-artist-activist, who headed the Knox Foundation and brought the carousel to Bushnell Park. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: June 25, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/housing/htfd_courant_062512.asp

Marking Twain In this editorial, the Hartford Courant memorializes Samuel Langhorne Clemens, "Mark Twain," who died 100 years ago, in April 1910. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: April 18, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_041810.asp

Mary Goodwin Dies At Age 91 Mary Goodwin's newspaper lineage extended for generations. A direct descendant of a 19th-century Hartford Courant printer and publisher, she reported on the 1944 Hartford circus fire, and was involved with local education first as a reporter, then as public information officer for the Hartford Board of Education. She also served as The Courant's ambassador to a sister paper in England in 1949. She died on July 1, 2008 at age 91. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: July 02, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_070208.asp

Massive Masterpiece Hartford is lucky to have a superb example of a building in the Romanesque Revival style designed by world-renowned architect Henry Hobson Richardson (1838-86), the R. and F. Cheney Building. In keeping with its mixed-use tradition, today the Richardson Building is home to a residence hotel, offices, stores, restaurants and rehearsal space for The Hartford Stage Company. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: September 25, 2005
Document Link: /issues/documents/ArtsandCulture/htfd_courant_092505.asp

MassMutual Building A Great Opportunity Tom Condon expresses the opinion that what is getting lost in the commotion over the MassMutual building is the opportunity being presented. There is a chance to enhance the city's Asylum Hill neighborhood, to make it more appealing on a number of fronts and reconnect it to downtown. Come up with an exciting plan, and it might well save the building. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: January 13, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_011308_1.asp

Mayor Mike Again? Mike McGarry comments that his friends want Mike Peters to continue to be Mayor Mike - the man about town, the guy who brings us together. Even today, with years past his term, and his afflictions, the term “Mayor Mike”, fits well. But, times have changed. Published by The Hartford News ; Publication Date: September 25, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/government/htfd_news_092508.asp

Mayor's Update, Winter 2008 A quarterly publication designed to share Mayor Perez's primary goals, objectives and accomplishments. The Winter 2008 issue includes updates on public safety and crime, Hartford neighborhood development, the mayor’s health insurance task force, the re-opening of the Hartford Public Library, and Coltsville’s designation as a National Historic Landmark. (PDF document, 6 pages) Published by Office of the Mayor, City of Hartford ; Publication Date: January 2008
Document Link: /issues/wsd/Government/MayorsUpdateWinter08.pdf

Meat Processor Mucke’s Marks Last Day In Hartford The Hartford plant of E.E. Mucke & Sons closed Friday, September 7, 2012, two weeks after the purchase of 93-year-old family business was finalized by a Massachusetts company. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: September 06, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/economicdevelopment/htfd_courant_090612.asp

Meet 'Twainiac' Cindy Lovell, New Director Of Mark Twain House Cindy Lovell calls herself a "Twainiac," because she's so crazy about Mark Twain. She's felt that way since she was a fourth-grader, when her teacher read the fence-whitewashing chapter of "The Adventures of Tom Sawyer" to the class. That was the beginning of a life in which Twain and teaching became Lovell's twin passions. After working for years as a university professor, she became director of the Mark Twain Boyhood Home in Hannibal, Mo. Now, following in Twain's footsteps, she has left Hannibal behind and calls Hartford home, as the new executive director of the Mark Twain House & Museum. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: April 10, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_041013_1.asp

Mentor, Educator Gave What He Received: Respect Vern Davis' life was shaped by the education he received, and he spent his adult life trying to pass on that gift to others. One of the first Black principals in the Hartford Public Schools, Davis recently died unexpectedly. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: March 08, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_030809.asp

Mike Peters, 1948-2009 A City's Champion: 'Mayor Mike' Peters Dies At 60 Mike Peters, the wisecracking fireman who over four terms as mayor helped lift Hartford from a political, financial and crime-ridden funk, died Sunday January 4, 2009, following a struggle with liver failure. He was 60. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: January 05, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_010509.asp

Mildred 'Micki' Savin, Arts Devotee, Dies at 94 Mildred 'Micki' Savin died Thursday, March 17th at her home in Bloomfield at the age of 94. Savin, a lifelong devotee of the arts, was a founder and president of many different organizations, such as the Connecticut Opera Guild and the Hartford Ballet. For nearly 60 years Savin organized fund-raisers and events for Hartford's arts organizations. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: March 21, 2005
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_032105.asp

Mobster's Death Marks End Of Era Anthony "Tony" Volpe, the last man to control greater Hartford's once-booming, now-moribund gambling and extortion rackets, died recently, prompting a flood of talk about another passed milestone in the city's evolution. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: December 29, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_122910.asp

Modern Makeover The history of the oldest house in Hartford's West End is all about the extreme makeover. First, the Elisha Wadsworth House, built in 1828, was an inn facing Albany Avenue. Then, in the early 1900s, it was turned to face Prospect Avenue and converted into a house. A front veranda and rear ell were demolished, and a new addition and third-story dormers were added, along with modern heating and plumbing. Now, a builder is completely redrawing the interior for what a 2013 buyer might want. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: September 15, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_091513.asp

More Legal Trouble For Coltsville The California businessman who last year won a $29 million lawsuit against Lance Robbins of the Coltsville project is back in court with a new lawsuit accusing Robbins of racketeering. Published by The Hartford Advocate ; Publication Date: June 15, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/downtowndevelopment/htfd_advocate_061510.asp

Mournful Final Note Hartford-based Austin Organs Inc., which for more than a century made organs for churches, universities and theaters around the world, has notified its sales representatives that it has closed because of financial difficulties. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: March 9, 2005
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_030905.asp

Moving On: Hartford Loses A Native Son A Hartford native, who is moving on writes that Hartford is neither as lovely as its proponents claim, nor as dreary as its critics claim. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: July 11, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_071110.asp

Mr. West Indian Passes Keith L. Carr Sr., whose pre-eminent leadership of his community in Greater Hartford for nearly half a century earned him the name "Mr. West Indian," died on January 7, 2008 after a battle with prostate cancer. He was 77. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: January 11, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/neighborhoods/htfd_courant_011108.asp

Murphy Bequest Provides $14 Million A West Hartford manufacturing executive who died in April has left $14 million to The Hartford Foundation for Public Giving to assist with a variety of local charitable efforts, including bolstering education and battling child hunger. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: September 29, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/educationfunding/htfd_courant_092907_1.asp

Museum on a Shoestring The state Museum of Connecticut History is starved for cash and attention, its tribute to the Industrial Revolution has been on hold for 20 years. Across the street from the state capitol, in a plain and dimly lit space is the Museum of Connecticut History. Published by The Hartford Advocate ; Publication Date: November 01, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/artsandculture/htfd_advocate_110107.asp

Museum Receives History Bonanza The Connecticut Historical Society Museum is the recipient of the Capobianco collection, which includes about 50 cubic feet of information: records from the Young Italian American Association; the constitution and bylaws of the St. Valentine's Social Club; century-old photographs of bocce and card games in Wallingford; and historic photographs of Hartford's now demolished Front Street and its Italian merchants. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: September 2, 2005
Document Link: /issues/documents/artsandculture/htfd_courant_090205.asp

Museums Must Adapt To Attract Latinos As the population of Hartford changes, how can its museums and other cultural attractions remain relevant? Today, Hartford County is 72 percent white and 15 percent of its residents identify as Latino/Hispanic. To improve their outreach to current residents, Hartford museums need to understand the cultural characteristics of the Latino/Hispanic population. Some Latinos are not accustomed to visiting museums; instead, they are seen as elitist places designed predominantly for wealthy whites. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: June 14, 2011
Document Link: /issues/documents/artsandculture/htfd_courant_061411.asp

Music In The Ring Willie Pep, a fighter for the ages, now belongs to the ages. Regarded by many as the greatest featherweight boxer of all time, Pep died November 23, 2006 at Haven Health Center of Rocky Hill, according to his grandson, William P. Papaleo of Farmington. He was 84. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: November 24, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/History/htfd_courant_112406.asp

New Chapter For Officer Leo LePage's book, about his time as a Hartford street cop, owes a lot to the scrapbooks kept by his late wife, Josephine. LePage used that rich history, his own recollections and a bit of artistic license to create "The Badge, the Street and the Cop," a story about (fictional) Officer Lance LaPore. The book has sold about 3,000 copies, remarkable for a self-published book with little more than word of mouth driving sales. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: August 11, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_081113.asp

New Guidelines On Historic Preservation Take Effect New guidelines that aim to safeguard both the city's historic properties and the pocketbooks of those who own them went into effect recently, setting home improvement standards that keep the city's low-income residents in mind, officials said. The city council adopted a new preservation ordinance in May 2005 that, among other things, puts a premium on protecting historic homes but also set a limit: the city can't compel property owners to make historically relevant repairs if those repairs add more than 20 percent to the cost of the project. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: December 15, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/Neighborhoods/htfd_courant_121506.asp

New Jackie McLean Biography Barely Scratches Surface When reading Derek Ansell's absorbing, studiously detailed accounts of jazz great Jackie McLean's numerous remarkable recordings, you'll wish that, through some high-tech magic, you had instantaneous access to every single one of these recordings. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: October 10, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_101012.asp

New Owners of Tobacco Shop in Downtown Hartford Say Store will Reopen May 9 After 91 years, The Tobacco Shop in downtown Hartford was about to close recently. Shop owner Jim DeLisle said he couldn't afford a rent increase imposed by the building's owner, and potential buyers seemed as scarce as a genuine Cuban cigar. But four former patrons purchased the shop and are moving the business to 89 Pratt St., a 2,000-square-foot retail space that was formerly a shoe store. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: May 03, 2011
Document Link: /issues/documents/downtowndevelopment/htfd_courant_050311.asp

New Twain House Director Named When Cindy Lovell starts her new job as executive director of The Mark Twain House & Museum, she won't have a big learning curve. Lovell, who was named to the position this week after a six-month nationwide search, has been teaching others about Hartford's most famous resident at his childhood home in Hannibal, Mo. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: January 11, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_011113.asp

Nineteen-Ninety-One Crisis Has Nothing On Looming Disaster The author of this opinion piece suggests that political observers will undoubtedly compare this year to 1991, when it took seven months and the obstinacy of a third-party governor to close a budget deficit of unprecedented proportions. What lies ahead, however, may well be worse. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: January 11, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/taxes/htfd_courant_011109.asp

No Rooms At Goodwin? The planned closing of the Goodwin Hotel, Hartford's luxury lodging in the heart of downtown, comes as a shock. The 124-room hotel at Asylum and Haynes streets, purchased by Northland Investment Corp. in 2005, was in the middle of a major renovation by the business district's largest property owner. Its loss would be a glaring detour in the capital city's route to renaissance. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: November 06, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/downtowndevelopment/htfd_courant_110608.asp

Not-So-Academic Journal Links Our Present With Our Past If the Hog River has long been mostly buried beneath Hartford, its namesake, Hog River Journal, is enjoying its fifth year as a lively historical quarterly. Staffers and subscribers celebrated their anniversary on Sunday, Jan. 20, 2008, at the reopened Hartford History Center at the city's downtown public library, which publishes the nonprofit magazine with input from a consortium of arts, historical, and educational organizations. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: January 13, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_011308.asp

Obama Administration Gives Conditional Support To Coltsville The National Park Service said recently that it's behind efforts to turn Hartford's Coltsville neighborhood into a national park, with several conditions. Published by CT Mirror ; Publication Date: April 23, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/ct_mirror_042313.asp

Old School's Days Are Over In this editorial, the Hartford Courant expresses the opinion that it's hard to know if this could have been avoided, but Hartford is about to lose another 19th-century building. For several years, the city planned to save the facade of the former board of education building on High Street and incorporate it into a new $77 million public safety complex. Work began last year: The interior of the building was gutted. Then, ominously, a three-story, 20-foot-wide section of wall on the east side of the building collapsed in a wind storm. City officials have been working with preservationists and others on this project for several years, so it's hard to understand why this issue was discovered so late in the game. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: April 10, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_041010.asp

Old State House Crisis Despite a recent $3.2 million renovation, one of the nation's oldest historic state houses is on the verge of closing its doors. Unless the state comes to the rescue, visitors will not be able walk the halls of the 211-year-old Federal-style building. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: February 26, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/artsandculture/htfd_courant_022607.asp

Old State House May Close The Old State House may close if state lawmakers approve Gov. M. Jodi Rell’s proposal to ax the operating budget for the 212-year-old historical landmark for the next two years. In the governor’s most recent budget cuts, Governor Rell proposes to suspend the state’s financial support of the museum by eliminating a $600,000 appropriation in fiscal year 2010 and $608,400 in fiscal year 2011 Published by The Hartford Business Journal ; Publication Date: June 08, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/hbj_060809.asp

Old State House Rescue Planned The feared summertime shuttering of the historic and financially strapped Old State House is an "unthinkable," unlikely last resort, state officials said recently. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: February 28, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/DowntownDevelopment/htfd_courant_022807.asp

Oldest Person Dead At 114 Emma Faust Tillman wanted to be remembered for having lived a good Christian life rather than having been the world's oldest person. So said John Stewart Jr., a day after his great-aunt died at age 114 on January 28, 2007. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: January 30, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/History/htfd_courant_013007.asp

On The Market: Hartford Building Was Part Of 1860s Streetscape Downtown Hartford’s skyline today is dominated by skyscrapers, including the state’s tallest tower, CityPlace I. But it still is possible to get a sense of what the city looked like in the mid-19th century when buildings rarely rose above five stories. One such building is the brownstone faced and trimmed Italianate-style structure at 6 Central Row, now listed for sale. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: September 12, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/downtowndevelopment/htfd_courant_091212.asp

One Hundred Years Ago, Triangle Shirtwaist Fire Sparked Hartford Reforms The Triangle Shirtwaist tragedy sparked union organizing efforts and a wide range of new safety laws. Yet even those reforms were vigorously blocked by manufacturers in Hartford and throughout the nation. Published by The Hartford News ; Publication Date: March 17, 2011
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_news_031711.asp

One Last Deadline For Hartford Times Staff A dwindling group of former Hartford Times employees met Sunday for its last annual reunion, the gathering coming exactly 30 years and a day after the paper ceased publication under the headline: "Hartford Times Closed after 159 Years." Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: October 23, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/History/htfd_courant_102306.asp

Only One Like Mayor Mike The irrepressible and beloved "Mayor Mike," who died Sunday, January 4, 2009, at 60 of complications from liver disease, was the right person at the right time for Hartford. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: January 06, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_010609.asp

Open Old State House On Sundays Downtown Hartford is livelier than it was in years gone by. There are more people living downtown, and more major weekend events, such as The Hartford Marathon and Hartford Parks Bike Tour. While these typically are Saturday events, people might stay over if there were more to do on Sundays. Gov. Dannel P. Malloy wants to put another piece in the puzzle by asking legislative leaders to open the Old State House on Sundays. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: July 13, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/downtowndevelopment/htfd_courant_071312.asp

Our Founder Honored This Hartford Courant editorial expresses the opinion that The Courant is honored that the New England Society of Newspaper Editors has chosen its founder, Thomas Green, as the recipient of The Yankee Quill Award, which recognizes a lifetime contribution toward excellence in journalism in New England. Mr. Green's pedigree in New England journalism is remarkable. Thomas Green founded the country's oldest continuously published newspaper. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: September 03, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_090310.asp

Oxford-Whitney Streets Historic District National Register Nomination A grant-funded effort is underway to apply for national register status so the area of Oxford, Whitney and Fern Streets in the West End of Hartford would become an historic district. This document is the nomination form filed with the US Department of the Interior. (PDF document, 76 pages) Published by West End Civic Association ; Publication Date: May 5, 2010
Document Link: /issues/wsd/history/oxford-whitney_national_register_nomination.pdf

Parklife: A Garden Blooms in Colt Park A master plan to build a botanical garden in Colt Park along Wethersfield Avenue is nearing completion. Could it be the piece in the puzzle that makes Hartford a destination? Published by The Hartford Advocate ; Publication Date: August 22, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/parks/htfd_advocate_082207.asp

Parkville Project Tells Local Tale Of Immigration The era in city history when Hartford was a manufacturing center which contrasts with today's vehement immigration debate are presented in a new, 90-minute play called "The Parkville Project" that opened recently, at West Hartford's Playhouse on Park, less than a mile down the road from the Hartford neighborhood it portrays. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: July 11, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/immigrants/htfd_courant_071110.asp

Parkville, USA: A Brief History Although Parkville is one of Hartford's smaller neighborhoods, it is one of the most distinctive and vibrant neighborhoods in the city. Published by The Hartford News ; Publication Date: September 29, 2011
Document Link: /issues/documents/neighborhoods/htfd_news_092911.asp

Paul Landerman Defined Hip In Hartford The author expresses the opinion that Paul Landerman, who died on September 19, 2008, was about as hip a person as Hartford has ever known. Paul was a trombonist and bandleader whose career began in the 1930s and flourished for roughly the next 60 years. Later in life, his playing days behind him, he became an agent and booker of musicians, whose agency supplied bands for what seemed like the vast majority of central Connecticut weddings for several decades. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: September 23, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_092308.asp

Peeling Back Layers of History A pre-Revolutionary War house located on the site of Trinity's future sports complex is being dismantled by preservationists. Some think that it is the oldest remaining house in Hartford, built sometime around 1740. The goal is to find a new site and put the house back together again as a resource for tourism, pre-Revolutionary Hartford history, and African American Hartford history. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: March 14, 2005
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_031405.asp

Pep's Name Should Grace Front Street Stan Simpson proposes renaming Front Street to honor Willie Pep. In his prime in the 1940s, Pep was considered one of the greatest prizefighters on the planet. Pep was reared in Hartford and was a regular on Front Street, the once bustling Italian enclave. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: March 8, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/History/htfd_courant_030806.asp

Peppercorn's Mama Cialfi: She Showed Her Love Through Cooking To the customers of Peppercorn's Grill in Hartford and Piccolo Arancio in Farmington, the lobster-stuffed ravioli is just as tender, the Sicilian cassata just as creamy and the almond cookies just as chewy. But there's something missing, a major change in the kitchen. Carmela Cialfi, chief pasta and pastry maker for both restaurants, is no longer elbow-deep in flour, no longer issuing exacting instructions to the sous chefs. Cialfa died suddenly on Sept. 26, 2012, just two months before her 78th birthday. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: November 16, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_111612_1.asp

Perez Makes Hartford Miss Peters All The More Helen Ubińas writes that Mayor Mike Peter's passing is a vivid reminder of what's lacking in this city today. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: January 08, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_010809.asp

Perez Makes Parking Deal Despite interest from the city's own parking authority, the administration of Mayor Eddie A. Perez recently awarded a potentially lucrative contract to manage a city-owned parking lot to a longtime political power broker in the city's North End. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: February 3, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/DowntownDevelopment/htfd_courant_020307.asp

Pianist Emery Smith To Close Baby Grand Jazz Series As one of the last living participants in Hartford's exuberant Golden Age of Jazz after World War II — an era when future giants Horace Silver and Gigi Gryce graced the swinging club scene in the North End — pianist Emery Austin Smith is unquestionably one of the city's grand patriarchs of jazz. He recently gave a solo piano concert as the season finale for the Hartford Public Library's free "Baby Grand Jazz" series. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: April 22, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/artsandculture/htfd_courant_042212.asp

Piled-On Problem Hawthorn Street in Hartford is another testament to the failure of urban renewal. Once a lovely and illustrious arm of Nook Farm, it is today a short, sad street whose main feature is an empty lot owned by an out-of-town developer who owes the city more than $1 million in back taxes. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: June 4, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/Neighborhoods/htfd_courant_060406.asp

Planned Closing Of Hotel A Discouraging Blow For City The Goodwin has followed the fortunes of Hartford for 125 years, first built as apartments for the rich at the height of the Victorian Gilded Age. By the 1970s, it had evolved into a bohemian, eclectic community of artists, writers and corporate executives not ready to flee for the suburbs. The building rode the boom-time money of the 1980s as it was hollowed out, literally, and redeveloped into a hotel and office tower. Now, as the city braces for the fallout of the biggest financial crisis in a generation and a looming recession, the Goodwin — and downtown Hartford — are again at a difficult crossroads. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: November 09, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/downtowndevelopment/htfd_courant_110908.asp

Players Sought For Gentle Sport Of Lawn Bowling Hartford's Thistle Lawn Bowling Club plays its games on lushly manicured lawn tucked into a corner of Elizabeth Park. The club has seen membership drop in recent years. With financial pressures mounting the club is in danger of closing unless new members are found. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: September 23, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/parks/htfd_courant_092307.asp

Plenty Of Bang For Their Bucks Melinda and Paul Sullivan were 5,000 miles from home when they learned that the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art, blaming a lack of funding, had canceled an exhibit focused on Hartford native son and Connecticut Yankee genius Samuel Colt. So after reading newspaper stories about the cancellation e-mailed to them in Hawaii, the West Hartford philanthropists pledged to pay the full cost of the display - $300,000. Museum officials announced the gift recently and said the reloaded exhibit will open Sept. 20. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: March 30, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/artsandculture/htfd_courant_033006.asp

Poet Hugh Ogden Dies Over the years, Hugh Ogden built various cabins on an island in Maine's Rangeley Lake. He described the island as a place where he "could hear the voices that call me to poems." On Sunday, while cross-country skiing to the mainland from his island paradise, the 69-year-old Trinity College English professor broke through the unusually thin ice and drowned. His death shocked his family and members of the college community. His children had been planning a surprise celebration later this year for Ogden's 70th birthday and 40th anniversary of teaching at Trinity. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: January 2, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/Education/htfd_courant_010207.asp

Poetry In Stone This year is the 100th anniversary of the dedication of the Bulkeley Bridge (formerly the Hartford Bridge), the graceful stone arch span that now carries I-84 traffic. We ought to celebrate it. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: January 02, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_010208.asp

Political Matriarch Sees Dream Coming True Once, during what now seems like another lifetime, Gertrude Johnson Mero caught a small glimpse of the epic moment that arrives today. Fifty years ago, Mero's husband, Wilfred Xavier Johnson, became the first black man elected to the General Assembly in Connecticut. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: November 04, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_110408.asp

Power Broker Abraham L. Giles Dies Political ward heelers pretty much went away after World War II, made obsolete by changes in civil service, welfare and election laws. But a few hung on in poor urban neighborhoods, where people weren't as connected to the system. One of them was Abraham L. Giles, the longtime power broker in the North End of Hartford. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: March 28, 2011
Document Link: /issues/documents/government/htfd_courant_032811.asp

Preservation Alliance Hires Executive Director The Hartford Preservation Alliance, which strives to preserve Hartford's architectural heritage and neighborhood character, has hired an executive director, marking a shift from a completely volunteer initiative to a professional staffed organization. Funding from the Hartford Foundation for Public Giving and the Surdna Foundation helped to support the staffing initiative. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: March 11, 2005
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_031105.asp

Preservation Alliance Presents Annual Awards The Hartford Preservation Alliance recently presented their annual awards to several companies, organizations and individuals who have made a significant contribution to preserving Hartford’s architectural heritage. Published by The Hartford News ; Publication Date: May 28, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/downtowndevelopment/htfd_news_052809.asp

Preservation Awards Tonight at City Hall The Hartford Preservation Alliance Awards ceremony was held on May 10 at in City Hall. The awards honored exceptional contributions to architectural preservation in Hartford during the past year. The ceremony included a reading of the Mayor’s Preservation Proclamation and updates on a variety of preservation-related issues. Published by The Hartford News ; Publication Date: May 10 - 17, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_news_051006.asp

Preservation Fiasco: Smart Plan For Hartford Public Safety Complex Crumbles The countdown to demolition ticks away for the Second North District School on High Street near downtown Hartford. It is bewildering how it came to this and what, if anything, will be learned if neighbors, preservationists, architects and those with an interest in putting Hartford's arts and heritage to good use shrug and chalk it up as another bad day for what used to be one of the most admired cities in America. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: May 09, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_050910.asp

Preservation Law, At Last The Hartford historic preservation ordinance, introduced in 2003, was passed last year by the city council, pending adoption of design guidelines. That painstakingly assembled protocol was finally approved on Nov. 13, to become effective 30 days later. The ordinance creates a historic preservation commission charged with preserving the character of properties listed on the state or national registers of historic places. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: November 28, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/History/htfd_courant_112806.asp

Preserving A Gem In this editorial, the Courant expresses the opinion that The Hartford Financial Services Group is known to be a good corporate citizen. It enhanced that reputation recently when it promised to save an eminent 1926 building in the heart of the city's insurance cluster. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: April 13, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/neighborhoods/htfd_courant_041308.asp

Preserving Historic Buildings Has Handsome Payoff Few people ever regret saving a historic building. A preserved and reused structure maintains a tangible tie with local history, retains the aesthetic quality of an area and contributes to our connection with the community, our sense of place. In addition, it turns out, historic preservation makes good economic sense. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: May 04, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_050412.asp

President Taft Drew A Crowd Of 10,000 The Day It Opened The State Armory was dedicated Nov. 12, 1909. A day of parades, ceremonies and music culminated with President William Howard Taft, standing on a table, dedicating the building before a throng of 10,000 citizens. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: October 03, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_100307.asp

Protecting A Legacy In this editorial, the Hartford Business Journal expresses the opinion that Hartford has many important landmarks, and the blue onion dome at the former Colt firearms factory is certainly one of them. The dome represents much more than an architectural landmark; it’s about the manufacturing genius of Samuel Colt, and how he and his factory workers put Hartford on the global map more than 150 years ago. Published by The Hartford Business Journal ; Publication Date: December 14, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/hbj_121409.asp

Putting New Life In Old Cemeteries Tom Condon endorses the idea that historic cemeteries are priceless treasures. We should use them, make parks out of them and encourage people to visit. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: May 13, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/History/htfd_courant_051307.asp

Putting The Spurs To Coltsville The effort to turn Coltsville into a national park is not dead, not by a long shot, but it has been dormant for some time. A federal study released last week may be just the giddyup it needs. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: December 06, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_120609.asp

Reading Marks 68th Anniversary Of Hartford Circus Fire Michael Downs, a former Courant sportswriter and now an assistant professor of English at Towson University in Maryland, has just published a collection of 10 related stories called "The Greatest Show" about the Hartford Circus Fire. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: July 01, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_070112.asp

Real Art Ways Marks 35 Years and Counting When it began in a second-floor walkup in 1975, Real Art Ways was an alternative artists' space, a loft for work and exhibitions and just as often experimental music. Scores of similar artists' collectives may have opened that year across the country in the era of homegrown art and counterculture creativity. But 35 years later, a decade into a new millennium, Real Art Ways remains a vibrant part of Greater Hartford's cultural offerings. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: October 21, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/artsandculture/htfd_courant_102110.asp

Rebel Without A Follow-Through For those who came of age in Connecticut in the late 1960s, reports that Ned Coll had been recently arrested twice in the same week evoked profoundly mixed emotions. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: July 26, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_072609.asp

Rebirth In Stone In August 2008, Trinity College completed a two-year, $33 million renovation of the Hartford campus' oldest buildings along what the college calls the "Long Walk" — the original building complex consisting of Seabury, Northam Towers and Jarvis that was constructed in the 1870s and 1880s. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: July 08, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/education/htfd_courant_070808.asp

Recognition Overdue For Park Pioneer Bushnell Park was designed by a man, whose name has long lain in undeserved obscurity: Jacob Weidenmann (1829-1893). His life and work are finally getting some long-overdue attention. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: March 09, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/parks/htfd_courant_030908.asp

Recovering a Lost Piece of Hartford History A chance discovery in Colt Park has led to an ongoing effort to recover a piece of Hartford history that has been lost for almost half a century. The discovery was made by Fairfield Avenue resident Karen O’Maxfield, President of the Hartford Vintage Baseball League. While doing some work for the league in one of the buildings located in Colt Park recently, O’Maxfield came upon a huge pile of metal plaques with names engraved on them, each approximately 12” x 10”. The plaques were part of a memorial to the 207 Hartford Veterans that lost their lives in World War I. The "Trees of Honor" memorial was erected in 1926 in Colt Park with sponsorship from the Rau-Locke American Legion Post # 8, which is still active and headquartered on Babcock Street. Published by The Hartford News ; Publication Date: September 05, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_news_090513.asp

Rell Decries Colt Rebuff In a short but sharply written letter to the chairman of the National Park Service, Gov. M. Jodi Rell expressed "bitter disappointment" over the rejection of the Colt Gateway complex's request for designation as a national historic landmark and urged the agency to reconsider. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: October 14, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_101406.asp

Remember Hartford Daughter's Part In The Battle Susan Campbell writes that we forget just how hard was the struggle to get the vote for women, and she urges us all to vote in the next election. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: October 31, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/democracy/htfd_courant_103110.asp

Remember Hartford Pioneer A little more than a year ago, the city of Hartford and Mayor Eddie A. Perez paid tribute to the late Olga Mele by dedicating a tree to her in Bushnell Park between the pond and the carousel. The honor was well deserved. Mrs. Mele was a legendary matriarch of Hartford's Puerto Rican community. Regrettably, the tree that was planted in her honor has died. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: June 7, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/Neighborhoods/htfd_courant_060707.asp

Remember The Dark Blues The grassy field at the corner of Wyllys Street and Hendrixsen Avenue near the Church of the Good Shepherd and close to downtown is the site of the Hartford Base Ball Grounds, home of the Hartford Dark Blues. In 1876, the local nine was one of the original eight teams in the National League. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: August 5, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/Parks/htfd_courant_080507.asp

Remembering Darrell Garner Hartford’s “No Name Park” may soon be nameless no more. City Councilman Ken Kennedy, State Representative Matt Ritter and others are leading a drive to rename the park in honor of long-time activist Darrell Garner, who passed away in July 2013 at the age of 78. “No-Name Park” lies off Sisson Avenue, behind the fire station, and was originally cleared to store construction equipment during the building of the Sisson Avenue highway entrance/exit. Published by The Hartford News ; Publication Date: August 22, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/neighborhoods/htfd_news_082213.asp

Remembering Dr. Spencer Shaw On June 16, 2010, Spencer G. Shaw, renowned storyteller, educator and librarian passed away at the age of 93. Born in Hartford in 1917, Dr. Shaw was among the first African American librarians to integrate the professional ranks of the Hartford Public Library. Published by Northend Agent's ; Publication Date: July 07, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/northend_agents_070710.asp

Remembering John D. Wardlaw David Radcliffe, a community organizer in Charter Oak Terrace, writes a tribute to John D. Wardlaw, who died in November 2008. Wardlaw was the Executive Director of the Hartford Housing Authority for more than a quarter of century. Published by The Hartford News ; Publication Date: December 04, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/housing/htfd_news_120408.asp

Remembering the Forgotten Victims of Hartford’s witchcraft trials were recently commemorated at a ceremony on South Green. Local historian Katherine Spada-Basto,said South Green was chosen because it was reported that some of the accused persons had gathered at the spot for “merry-making” that involved dancing and drinking wine. Published by The Hartford News ; Publication Date: May 23 - 30, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/History/htfd_news_052307.asp

Remembering the Mayor Mike Years A compilation of articles about Mayor Mike Peters from past issues of the Hartford News. Published by The Hartford News ; Publication Date: January 15, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_news_011509.asp

Remembering the Old Bulkeley, Celebrating The Renewed M.D. Fox The recent restoration of M.D. Fox Elementary School, formerly Bulkeley High School, has sparked renewed interest in the history of this unique school. Published by The Hartford News ; Publication Date: October 10, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/education/htfd_news_101013.asp

Remembering When The Roof Fell In Thirty-five years ago, the roof of the center's Veterans Memorial Coliseum collapsed. Miraculously, nobody was hurt. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: January 18, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_011813.asp

Renewing a Historic Legacy: The Park System of Hartford Connecticut The park network of the city of Hartford, which in the early 20th century was one of the best in the nation, needs attention if it is to rise to prominence again in the 21st. While the city still has an impressive quantity of parkland in relation to its size and population, decades of deferred maintenance has diminished the quality of park landscapes and buildings to the point that this multi-million-dollar resource is at severe risk. Building upon the recommendations in this report, the parks could rise as a system to become one of the true drivers of Hartford’s economy, image and community fabric. (PDF document, 32 pages) Published by Trust for Public Lands ; Publication Date: October 2007
Document Link: /issues/wsd/parks/HartfordparkReport.pdf

Renovated Factories Transcend Their Pasts As They Become Places To Call Home Lance Jay Robbins, who heads a company called Urban Smart Growth, is an expert at re-purposing former factory and mill properties around the country and transforming them into residential living space. The Los Angeles-based developer hopes to complete the $120 million restoration of the former Colt factory complex, which calls for 238 apartments in three separate buildings. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: July 10, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/housing/htfd_courant_071009.asp

Rescuing Old State House Only hours after gunfire sent 10 teenagers running for their lives and forced the lockdown of an elementary school, Hartford's police chief and the school system's spokesman attributed the violence to racial tension at Hartford Public High School. Now they're not so sure. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: March 7, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/artsandculture/htfd_courant_030707.asp

Resounding Vote for Tradition A recent celebration of the traditional Black Governor "Lection" in Hartford brought history alive for the African American community. The tradition hearkens to the mid-1700s, when slaves and freedmen in Connecticut - who couldn't vote in regular elections - began electing members of their community to represent them. The black governors were considered moral leaders. Eric Crawford, a district intervention specialist for Hartford schools won the election. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: April 10, 2005
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_041005.asp

Restoration Beats Demolition Nearly three years ago, Hartford enacted a historic preservation ordinance to maintain the city's disappearing architectural heritage. The gist of this first-in-the-state law is that before owners of properties in local, state or national historic districts can change the exterior of a building or demolish it, the work must be approved by a preservation commission. To see how well it's worked, let's look at a project that moved ahead just before the law was passed, and one of the first that was covered by the preservation ordinance. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: November 01, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/government/htfd_courant_110109.asp

Retired City Teacher Honored As Historian For Hartford Public High School The guardian of Hartford Public High School's 375-year history is not the famed brownstone owl that sits on a perch in the Forest Street building, perpetually gazing at staff and students. It's R.J. Luke Williams, 70, the retired history teacher credited with preserving that Albert Entress owl sculpture and other school artifacts. Recently, Williams received recognition from the city during a brief ceremony in the school's Lewis Fox Memorial Library Media Center, where an 1800s portrait of George Washington — another successful restoration project — seemed to preside over guests. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: April 16, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_041613.asp

Revisiting Downtown Hartford's Lost Architectural Treasures In 1990, a local Hartford bank reassured city leaders that plans for an office tower at the corner of Main and Asylum streets were real and that the 45-story edifice would be built. Just one thing stood in the way: the 78-year-old Hartford-Aetna Building, the city's first skyscraper. Over the protests of preservationists, the 11-story building came tumbling down. Today, nearly 25 years later, there is no tower, only a parking lot. A new book, "Vanished Downtown Hartford," provides a tour through the downtown area, chock full of engravings and photos tracing the city's development — and redevelopment — beginning in the early 1800s. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: July 27, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/downtowndevelopment/htfd_courant_072713.asp

Reviving Pope's Legacy Bicycle, Car King's Namesake Hartford Park Getting An Overhaul Colonel Albert Pope, the world's largest bicycle manufacturer and, for a time, its largest automaker, was one of Hartford’s largest employers about one hundred years ago. The legacy he gave Hartford, 90 rolling acres on both sides of Park Street for a public park that bears his name, is being revitalized by a planned infusion of $13.6 million. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: August 09, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/parks/htfd_courant_080909.asp

Revolutionary? Where? State Has To Help Tourists Find Historic Sites Connecticut's new marketing campaign, "Still Revolutionary," with its mix of history and innovation, is a good first step to attract tourists. But history is more than a tool to manipulate tourists. This marketing campaign will ring hollow unless Connecticut appreciates what it has and shows it the respect it deserves. The state has often treated its history as an afterthought, allowing buildings and treasured sites to fall apart. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: May 21, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_052112.asp

Richard Welling Was A Hartford Original In this editorial, the Courant expresses the opinion that a building wasn't part of the Hartford skyline until Richard Welling drew it. Mr. Welling, who died last weekend at 83, was the unofficial artist-historian of Hartford during its most intense period of transition. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: November 15, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/artsandculture/htfd_courant_111509.asp

River Was Where Road Is In this opinion piece, Wilson H Faude discusses the Metropolitan District Commission plans to tap a brook in Bloomfield and have it flow in Bushnell Park along the former path of the Park River. In fact, the river flowed where the streets are on the north side of the park. When the Army Corps of Engineers buried the river after the floods of the late 1930s, they took away a substantial amount of parkland. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: March 19, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/History/htfd_courant_031906.asp

Riverfront Recapture Ten years ago, not even 20-20 vision would have enabled people to visualize what they see along the Riverfront today. Published by The Hartford News ; Publication Date: February 18, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_news_021810_1.asp

Robert Frick Left Historic Mark On Twain House The Mark Twain House in Hartford was many things after the famed author left in 1891; private home, school, warehouse, apartment house, branch library and fledgling museum. By the late 1950s, it was a casual affair, a mix of visitors and a few residents including the house's overseer, Margaret Graves, who owned a parakeet named Snowball who loved to swoop from one door to another, to the delight of visitors. It was at this point the trustees began "the restoration," the work that would eventually produce today's internationally known house museum visited by tens of thousands of people each year. The key was finding a leader. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: June 05, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_060513.asp

Robert J. Jackson; Key Hartford Democrat: Dies At 66 Robert J. "Bob" Jackson, a longtime city Democratic political strategist who helped Mike Peters win his race for mayor, died Sunday August 14, 2011 at his home in Bloomfield. He was 66. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: August 18, 2011
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_081811.asp

Rory O'Neil Saw How To Connect Hartford To The River C. Roderick "Rory" O'Neil died at the end of July 2012 at 81. He was a major figure in the business world, a senior executive at The Travelers and later the business partner of Alan Greenspan. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: July 30, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/parks/htfd_courant_073012.asp

Rory O'Neil, Riverfront Recapture Co-Founder, Dies At 81 The co-founder of Riverfront Recapture, the 31-year-old nonprofit organization dedicated to restoring Hartford's access to the Connecticut River, died July 28, 2012 in Greenwich. He was 81. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: July 30, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_073012.asp

Saddling Up For Longevity When George Washington was president, Smith-Worthington Saddlery Co. in Hartford was busy making horse saddles in Hartford. Today, 42 presidents later, the company is still up and running, making about 250 customized and custom-fit saddles each year. Published by The Hartford Business Journal ; Publication Date: October 19, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/economicdevelopment/hbj_101909.asp

Saint Joseph Cathedral Celebrates 50th Anniversary This Sunday Archbishop Henry J. Mansell will celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the consecration of the Cathedral of Saint Joseph, 140 Farmington Ave. in Hartford, on May 20th at 3 p.m. Published by The Hartford News ; Publication Date: May 17, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/faithcommunity/htfd_news_051712.asp

Sam Colt's Dress Blues, A New Find, Sheds Light On Brief Chapter In Civil War In May 1861, Samuel Colt was Hartford's richest, most famous citizen. A charismatic, driven entrepreneur, Colt possessed inventive genius, boundless imagination and unsurpassed marketing prowess. After President Lincoln asked for volunteers to put down the rebellion, Colt contacted Connecticut's Republican Gov. William A. Buckingham with an offer to raise, train and equip a full regiment, each man armed with one of Colt's patented revolving rifles. Colt, then 46, insisted upon leading the regiment himself. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: May 14, 2011
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_051411.asp

Samuel Colt, Warts And All On the eve of a National Park Service vote to decide whether Sam Colt's firearms manufacturing empire should be a National Landmark, a precursor to having it become a national park, debate has taken shape in The Courant's Commentary section about whether Mr. Colt is worthy of the honor, or of any special attention at all. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: October 1, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/History/htfd_courant_100106_a.asp

Samuel Stone Gets a Statue A bronze statue of the Rev. Samuel Stone, the Englishman responsible for co-founding and naming Hartford, has been given a permanent home in front of the city's Ancient Burying Ground. Hartford resident Karen Will and other members of the Hartford/Hertford Sister City Committee raised over $30,000 to bring the statue to Hartford. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: April 26, 2005
Document Link: /issues/documents/artsandculture/htfd_courant_042605.asp Related Link(s): Town of Hertford, England

Sara Greenberg: In Big Band Era, A Sense Of Design And Fun Sara Greenberg — everyone called her Sooky, like cookie — thought that her birth date, 10-10-10, gave her mystical powers. Not everyone was convinced, but there was a consensus that Greenberg found life a lot of fun, and she showed that great enthusiasm for more than a century. Greenberg, a West Hartford resident, died Dec. 15, 2011 at age 101. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: June 29, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_062912_2.asp

Save Hartford's Old South Burying Ground Old cemeteries, like old buildings, need to be used to be preserved. That may be the key to saving one of Hartford's most historic graveyards. The Old South Burying Ground off Maple Avenue, established in 1800, is the final resting place of many Hartford notables. Old South has been heavily vandalized over the years. A master plan is being developed for Old South, and that work to preserve it could begin within a year. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: January 10, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_011013.asp

Save The Capewell In this editorial, the Courant expresses the opinion that the Capewell Horse Nail Co. factory building needs to be saved. In addition to its historical status, the Capewell project is in a key location, on the southeastern fringe of downtown. It can be a bridge between the Colt project and Adriaen's Landing and downtown. It can bring development to the surrounding blocks, which will in turn help downtown development move south, as it should. It behooves the city on several levels to save the Capewell. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: May 11, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/downtowndevelopment/htfd_courant_051108.asp

Save The Old State House This Courant editorial expresses the opinion that to close the Old State House in downtown Hartford for lack of funding would be unthinkable. The state must quickly take ownership of one of Connecticut's most important landmarks. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: February 27, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/artsandculture/htfd_courant_022707.asp

Saving The City's Heritage Not too long ago, historic buildings were torn down willy-nilly in Hartford. That, thankfully, is no longer the case, and a major reason is the emergence of the Hartford Preservation Alliance under executive director Laura Knott-Twine. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: April 06, 2011
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_040611.asp

Saving the Old State House The fate of the Old State House is up in the air, as the Connecticut Historical Society has run out of money to run the 18th century building. Without state funding, the Old State House will have to be shuttered Published by The Hartford Advocate ; Publication Date: April 5, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/DowntownDevelopment/htfd_advocate_040507.asp

Scaffolding Shrouds Travelers Tower For $30M Face-Lift For New York, it's the Empire State Building. For Philadelphia, it's city hall. For Hartford, the landmark of the cityscape is Travelers Tower, though it may be a little harder to recognize these days encased in a latticework of scaffolding. The 527-foot-tall tower, with 34 floors, is getting a face-lift at a cost of $30 million. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: August 08, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/downtowndevelopment/htfd_courant_080813.asp

Segarra Statement On Passing Of Maria B. Gonzalez Mayor Pedro E. Segarra recently paid his respects to the family of Maria B. Gonzalez, a former Hartford City Councilwoman, educator and community leader, who died on January 28th at the age of 72. Published by Hartford Cityline, The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: February 03, 2011
Document Link: /issues/documents/government/cityline_020311.asp

Selling Good Sleep Gold Bond Mattress Co., a privately owned Hartford company, continues to manufacture mattresses and futons on Weston Street. Family-owned and operated for four generations, Gold Bond employs 75 to 100 workers, depending on the season. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: January 17, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/EconomicDevelopment/htfd_courant_011707.asp

Sentimental Journey For Jews To Hartford's North End A recent bus tour titled "Back of the Old Neighborhoods" sponsored by the Jewish Historical Society of Greater Hartford was an outgrowth of a book the society published last year, "Remembering the Old Neighborhood: Stories of Hartford's North End," a comprehensive collection of essays and oral histories from people, mostly Jews, who grew up in the North End in the mid-20th century. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: October 17, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_101712.asp

Service A Celebration Of Knight's Life Hartford native and local basketball legend, Bobby Knight, died on May 23, 2008 at the age of 79. At the celebration of his life, many spoke glowingly of the man who, despite all he did for others, was adamant about not being in the spotlight. He was well-known basketball player, first at Weaver in the 1940s, then for the Harlem Globetrotters and the Knicks in the '40s and '50s, and finally in the industrial/semipro leagues, and was elected to the New England Basketball Hall of Fame in 2006. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: May 31, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/familiesandchildren/htfd_courant_053108.asp

She Changed The World Harriet Beecher Stowe, author of the novel "Uncle Tom's Cabin" which helped turn the country against slavery and lay the groundwork for the Civil War was born 200 years ago in Litchfield, CT. Her bicentennial was recently celebrated in Hartford by the Harriet Beecher Stowe Center. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: June 09, 2011
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_060911.asp

Shepherd Holcombe: A Passion For Hartford And Its History Shepherd Holcombe, the descendent of a family that arrived in Connecticut in the 1600s was connected to Connecticut, its history, its people. Shepherd Holcombe, who was born on June 12, 1921, grew up in a home on Spring St., where six generations of his family had lived. A staunch booster of Hartford's history, Holcombe died Nov. 28, 2012. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: December 17, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_121712.asp

Shining A Beacon On African American Artists Deirdre L. Bibby, 56, of Hartford, died March 6, 2008. Deirdre Bibby was a pioneer who dedicated most of her professional life to the emerging field of museums dedicated to exhibiting the work of African-American artists. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: April 06, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_040608_1.asp

Shooting Scene: Not His Grandparents' Neighborhood A former Hartford resident writes about seeing a recent video on the Hartford Courant website which showed his grandparents’ house, which had been the scene of a gun crime. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: May 01, 2011
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_050111.asp

Signs Of Hartford's Good Times Going Up Not long ago, some people in the arts and heritage worlds realized that they would be more effective — in attracting patrons and dollars — if they worked together. The latest child from that union is a series of street signs that will start to go up around Hartford, courtesy of Greater Hartford Arts Council, among other organizations, to mark events and people, both ridiculous and sublime. The point is to mark as many interesting spots as possible, and to remind people that Hartford had it going on once, and it could again. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: January 06, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_010608.asp

Simon Konover Celebrates 50th Year As A Developer Simon Konover was 26 in 1948 when he arrived in Hartford, a Holocaust survivor and nearly penniless. In the decades that followed, Konover, now 87, would build one of the area's most successful development companies, at one point developing and owning more than 100 shopping centers in the Northeast and Florida. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: October 06, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/economicdevelopment/htfd_courant_100609.asp

SINA: The Learning Corridor and Beyond Of all the projects that have been completed in Hartford in the past decade, one of the biggest and most important was also one of the first: The Learning Corridor. Published by The Hartford News ; Publication Date: February 18, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_news_021810.asp

Slavery and Free Labor In March, 1860, Abraham Lincoln considers an invitation to Hartford, determined to widen his appeal as a possible presidential candidate. “Do not fail, for the sake of Connecticut,” his anxious host wrotes in anticipation. On that cold winter night of March 5th, Honest Abe does not disappoint. He spoke to a packed house at Hartford City Hall, located on Temple and Main Streets. Published by The Hartford News ; Publication Date: March 04, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_news_030410.asp

Smart Move On Wadsworth The preservation of a 130-year-old Italianate style house at 53 Wadsworth St. in Hartford's South Green neighborhood is a lesson in effective community intervention. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: December 14, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/History/htfd_courant_121406.asp

Smoke Shop Finds Its Niche on Pratt Street The walk-in humidor with its Spanish-cedar foundation is home to cigars from around the world, all kept fresh by a patented, and still functioning, 1917 humidifier. The apparatus tells the story of a tobacco business whose presence in Hartford spans almost 100 years. It started with a couple of wine stewards from the old Bond Hotel and has evolved to two partners — a retired IT worker and a building inspector — who share an entrepreneurial spirit, inquisitive minds and the love of a good stogie. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: May 07, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/economicdevelopment/htfd_courant_050712.asp

Society Director Takes On New Orleans Challenge David M. Kahn, the executive director of the Connecticut Historical Society Museum, is stepping down in May to take a job in New Orleans as the director of the Louisiana State Museum. Kahn, who has headed the city museum for more than nine years, said that the opportunity to move to New Orleans and help a historic institution rebuild in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina was an assignment he could not pass up. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: March 16, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/History/htfd_courant_031606.asp

Soldiers And Sailors Arch To Be Rededicated The Connecticut Civil War Commemoration Commission and the Bushnell Park Foundation recently rededicated the arch for its intended purpose — to honor the more than 4,000 Hartford men who served in the Civil War and the 400 who died in it. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: September 16, 2011
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_091611.asp

Something to Say Hartford is No. 1 There seems to be a growing consensus that small, sustainable development plans are what can help cities limping along in their struggle to maintain a steady tax base and a thriving economy. As a location to launch a small business, the Hartford metro region has been named number five in the nation by CNNMoney.com. Small businesses provide the backbone of enterprise in the community, and the whole region does better when its businesses are many and diverse. Published by Urban Compass ; Publication Date: October 14, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/ucompass_101409.asp

Special Events At Stowe Center The Harriet Beecher Stowe Center celebrated Stowe's 200th birthday recently with a number of events, including the awarding of the inaugural Stowe Prize. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: June 09, 2011
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_060911_1.asp

Special Status At Colt Denied A committee of architects, historians, archaeologists and preservationists recently rejected a bid to grant the Colt complex National Historic Landmark status. According to John W. Roberts, the acting chief of the National Register of Historic Places, National Historic Landmarks Program, six members of the service's landmark committee voted to reject the designation for the site; one opposed the rejection and another abstained. Members of the committee opposed the bid because of concerns over planned changes to the building's integrity. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: October 13, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_101306.asp

St. Anne's Class Of '56 Gets Together When members of the Class of 1956 recall their days at the former St. Anne's School in Hartford, they remember strict nuns in starched habits, and separate lunches, and recess times that kept boys and girls from fraternizing. But the former students, now in their 60s, say their best memories are of the friendships they made: meeting at the Frog Hollow Restaurant for soda and grinders, catching a movie at the Lyric Theater or ice-skating at Pope Park. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: February 14, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_021406.asp

Stackpole, Moore & Tryon And Tuesdays - A Perfect Marriage Once there were two clothing shops that were a few blocks apart, shared customers and good names in downtown Hartford. Well, everything changes and today, both shops are one: Stackpole, Moore and Tryon and Tuesdays, together at the corner of Pratt and Trumbull streets, right across from the XL Center. Published by The Hartford News ; Publication Date: July 18, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/downtowndevelopment/htfd_news_071813_1.asp

State Can Give Tourism, Culture An Economic Edge As part of his bureaucratic streamlining of state agencies, Gov. Dannel Malloy has proposed moving the Commission on Culture & Tourism into the Department of Economic and Community Development. Can it work? Yes, if the agency looks seriously at the economics of culture and tourism. To succeed, the newly merged agency must treat tourism and the cultural resources it depends on as a high-priority economic cluster, as we do with bioscience and financial services. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: April 01, 2011
Document Link: /issues/documents/artsandculture/htfd_courant_040111.asp

State Man's Tragedy Unlocked Secrets Of The Brain The man who fundamentally changed our understanding of how the brain works lived for nearly three decades in a Windsor Locks nursing home, a pleasant man with a damaged memory. Henry Gustav Molaison, a Hartford native, existed in relative obscurity. But as "H.M.," the name used to disguise his identity, Molaison gained an anonymous sort of fame, a man who had been studied by more than 100 researchers and became a staple of psychology class lectures. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: December 06, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/health/htfd_courant_120608.asp

State Must Nurture Deep Entrepreneurial Roots Connecticut is at a crossroad when it comes to entrepreneurship and small business growth. Despite President Barack Obama's recent signing of the fiscal year 2013 defense budget, cuts to the Department of Defense loom in the coming months. If Congress is unable to act with jobs in mind, thousands of civilian contractors and employees in Connecticut may be laid off. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: January 29, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/economicdevelopment/htfd_courant_012913.asp

State Painters Revealed The Forest And The Trees Although a small state with modest topographical features, Connecticut has exerted much influence on how the nation views its landscape. The most cursory peek at the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art's "American Splendor" exhibition of 19th-century Hudson River School paintings leaves no doubt. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: July 16, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/artsandculture/htfd_courant_071606_a.asp

State To Operate Old State House The state and the city of Hartford finally reached an agreement that paves the way for the state to take over the operation of the Old State House, preventing the threatened closure of the historic downtown building. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: June 28, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/artsandculture/htfd_courant_062808.asp

State's Governors Often Have Had To Deliver Bad Budget News With the state facing soaring budget deficits in the next two years — projected to be as high as $2.6 billion next year and $3.3 billion the following year — state officials say this is the worst fiscal time they can remember. Gov. M. Jodi Rell's warnings evoke memories of other notable State of the State addresses and budget messages over the past four decades. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: January 11, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/government/htfd_courant_011109.asp

State's Witches Could Be Absolved After more than 300 years, the Connecticut residents accused of witchcraft finally might be vindicated thanks to what began as a school project. State legislators recently took up the issue of Connecticut's witch trials, the result of efforts by 14-year-old Addie Avery and her mother, Debra Avery, descendants of a Hartford woman accused of witchcraft and probably hanged. The judiciary committee discussed a resolution that would absolve the approximately 40 residents accused of practicing witchcraft in the mid- to late-17th century. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: March 21, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_032108.asp

Stately Buildings, Trees Falling At MassMutual In this opinion piece, the author suggests that The Hartford Financial Services Group is deliberately and methodically — and they had hoped, quietly — proceeding with the largest demolition to take place in Hartford since the urban renewal era of the mid-20th century. The Hartford is now in the midst of destroying some 450,000 square feet of structurally sound, substantially built, readily adaptive office space, which formerly served Connecticut Mutual and then MassMutual quite well. To add insult to injury, The Hartford has already or will soon cut down more than 30 mature trees on this site. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: March 29, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_032909_1.asp

Staying In Touch Every few years, whenever the spirit calls out, someone organizes a company reunion for O'Neal & Prelle, one of Connecticut's oldest advertising agencies. Never mind that the former Hartford agency closed nearly eight years ago after a string of business blows sent it into a nose dive. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: April 02, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_040208.asp

Steam Boiler Explosion Led To Push For Medical Facility At 2:10 p.m. on March 2, 1854, an explosion destroyed most of the Fales & Gray Car Works on Potter Street near Dutch Point. The accident and investigation led to the formation of the Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection and Insurance Co. and Hartford Hospital. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: February 28, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/History/htfd_courant_022807.asp

Still Revolutionary: $27 Million State Tourism Campaign Launched The new tourism slogan — "Connecticut: Still Revolutionary" — could boost history-related attractions, but it's also meant to remind residents and visitors that the state is a leader in the arts, science and engineering, and civil rights. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: May 14, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_051412.asp

Stitching Together An Artistic Heritage Bruce Fraser, the late director of the Connecticut Humanities Council, lamented that Connecticut lacked a "literature of itself." There is such a literature, but it's sparse. But what Connecticut does have — brilliantly — is an art history of itself, alive and well in the 200-plus museums that preserve and present our cultural heritage. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: January 30, 2011
Document Link: /issues/documents/artsandculture/htfd_courant_013011.asp

Stopping By On Way To Greatness In the week after Abraham Lincoln's speech at Cooper Union in New York on Feb. 27, 1860, the future president passed through Connecticut on the way to visit his son at Exeter, N.H. Lincoln agreed to stop in Hartford on his return. Soon after he arrived in Hartford, Lincoln met newspaper editor Gideon Welles, whom Lincoln would appoint, one year later, secretary of the Navy. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: February 15, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_021509.asp

Storied 1781 March Traced: Continentals, French Crossed Connecticut The story of French soldiers who marched across Connecticut in June 1781 to help their Continental brothers defeat the British will be told this year in a string of detailed panels. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: March 12, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/History/htfd_courant_031206_a.asp

Stories To Share The state legislature is considering a proposal to allow 16- and 17-year-olds charged with less serious crimes to be treated as juveniles in the criminal justice system. This article presents the views of advocates on both sides of the issue. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: April 6, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/History/htfd_courant_040607.asp

Stowe Center Does It Right The struggling economy weighs heavily on many sectors of society, not least its heritage sites. Museums and historic homes are severely challenged. One way these important institutions can survive is to connect their historic purpose with present concerns. Few have done this as well as Hartford's Harriet Beecher Stowe Center. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: November 14, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_111408.asp

Stowe Center's Rose Gardens Win National Award Roses must have meant a great deal to Harriet Beecher Stowe, author of "Uncle Tom's Cabin." Stowe was a passionate gardener who cultivated roses at her home on Forest Street in Hartford. The Harriet Beecher Stowe Center's research and re-creation of the historic landscape of Stowe's Victorian gardens recently earned the Jane Righter Rose Medal from the Garden Club of America. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: May 28, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_052810_1.asp

Stowe House Designated As National Historic Landmark The Harriet Beecher Stowe House is one of 13 newly designated National Historic Landmarks, the National Park Service and the Secretary of the Interior announced on recently. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: March 11, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_031113.asp

Street-wise Politics The Abe Giles Way In this editorial, the Hartford Courant states that long-time North End political boss Abraham L. Giles, who died a year ago, is making news — and stirring up controversy — once again. Hartford city councilwoman Cynthia Jennings has proposed that the city honor him by designating the corner of Main and Windsor streets as "Abraham Giles Way." A public hearing will be held April 16 at city hall. Mr. Giles' generosity and commitment to his constituents should be fondly recalled. But it would be bizarre and inappropriate to name a public street corner after him. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: March 30, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/government/htfd_courant_033012.asp

Students' Photos Record Change An exhibit at the University of Hartford called "Now and Then: Albany Avenue" will show the transition of Albany Avenue as a neighborhood of predominantly Jewish immigrants and businesses in the early 20th century, to today's community of African American, West Indian and Hispanic residents and businesses. The exhibit will run between February and August at the George J. Sherman and Lottie K. Sherman Museum of Jewish Civilization, in the university's Mortensen Library, and features historical photos, videos and oral histories from the archives of the Jewish Historical Society of Greater Hartford, and students' photos. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: December 28, 2004
Document Link: /issues/documents/neighborhoods/courant_122804.asp Related Link(s): University of Hartford

Swift Factory: Redevelopment Of Gold Leaf Factory In Hartford The Swift factory building on Love Lane, where gold leaf applied to medals, may again take its place at the center of the community. The Swift family has donated the old factory to the nonprofit organization Common Ground, which plans to renovate the space for artisans, small business incubators and perhaps even business co-ops. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: April 12, 2011
Document Link: /issues/documents/neighborhoods/htfd_courant_041211.asp

Syd Barnett: West Indian Activist, Neighborhood Champion Syd Barnett was a mechanic, a musician and a businessman, but most of all he was a community activist who worked hard to improve his neighborhood. Barnett died on June 19, 2012 at age 96. He was living in Bloomfield. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: August 06, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_080612.asp

Symbolic Stick Work Recently City Clerk John Bazzano handed over the symbolic Mayor's Walking Stick to HPL Board President Greg Davis. The gesture, which took place in the Hartford History Center on the third floor of the main branch, signified city hall's turning over of hundreds of years of public documents to the center to make them available to the public. Published by Hartford Cityline, The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: November 17, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/cityline_111710.asp

Take Time For Time The 40-Year Plan, an forum which is considering long-term solutions to Hartford's long-standing problems is holding its first-ever live community discussion at La Paloma Sabanera Café at 410 Capital Avenue in Hartford. Panelists Fernando Betancourt, Matt Fleury and Bernadine Silvers, and Ken Krayeskei will converse about “Hartford in 14,610 Days, or Brainstorming for the Future Published by The Hartford News ; Publication Date: April 12 - 19, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_news_041206.asp

Talks Raise Hopes For Saving 1926 Building The Hartford has applied for a permit to demolish the former MassMutual headquarters on Asylum Hill, but the insurer will soon seek development proposals for the 16-acre site that could save all or part of the historic structure. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: January 12, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_011208.asp

Tall Tree, Tall Tales In the bowels of the Connecticut Historical Society, Richard C. Malley led a cook's tour. As assistant director of museum collections, and curator of technology, Malley knows his way around the museum's extensive holdings. He located pieces from Hartford's legendary Charter Oak, the tree that adorns the Connecticut quarter-dollar. The society has furniture from the tree, picture frames, jewelry, napkin rings - and simple, undeveloped hunks of the tree. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: August 10, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/History/htfd_courant_081007.asp

Task Force Ideas Fizzle Efforts to draft a historic preservation ordinance in Hartford are hindered by a low homeownership rate, low income homeowners, and the number of buildings that would be effected. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: March 28, 2005
Document Link: /issues/documents/downtowndevelopment/htfd_courant_032805.asp

Teacher's Travels Broadened Horizons Of All Who Knew Her Mary J. Cromwell, 85, of Hartford, died March 18, 2007. She was a teacher with a sense of adventure that took her to Korea, India, China and Africa. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: July 1, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/History/htfd_courant_070107.asp

Tell the State's Story to Students Bill Hosley, former curator at the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art and former executive director of the Antiquarian & Landmarks Society, discusses the merits of requiring that Connecticut history be taught in public schools. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: March 6, 2005
Document Link: /issues/documents/region/htfd_courant_030605.asp

Temples Woven In Hartford History The Art Deco building at Greenfield and Woodland streets is a window into Hartford's ethnic history. There are no active Jewish synagogues in the city today, but there were more than a dozen, beginning in the 1800s. For more than a century, in what is a distinctly American practice, houses of worship were regularly conveyed back and forth between Jewish and Christian congregations. Many of these buildings remain in use, most often as Protestant churches with largely African-American congregations. Yet they recall the vibrant Jewish community that was much a part of the city in the 19th and 20th centuries. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: February 19, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/FaithCommunity/htfd_courant_021906.asp

Terminal B On Its Last Days At Bradley International Airport It's not easy finding someone, anyone, to sing the praises of America's oldest operating airport terminal. The Murphy Terminal at Bradley International Airport, opened in 1952 and also known as Terminal B, is a drab ghost town — agentless ticket counters, frozen escalators, vacant food service spaces. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: April 14, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/transportation/htfd_courant_041410.asp

Testifying To Coltsville's Promise Tom Condon testified recently before the House subcommittee in favor of Congressman John Larson's bill that would make Hartford's Coltsville a National Park. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: June 13, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_061310.asp

Thank You Miss Emma Rose This is a shout-out to Miss Emma Rose, wherever she may be. Like a good librarian, she kept at least one newspaper and magazine clipping file about black liberation and American history. Published by The 40-Year Plan ; Publication Date: January 24, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/yrplan_012410.asp

That Empty Feeling When a neighborhood really starts to turn itself around, a blighted building becomes a 400-pound gorilla. Progress abounds in Hartford's Frog Hollow - from lovely rehabs to the Pope Park entrance to dramatic improvements to the Park Street streetscape, making the abandoned four-story apartment building at 900-902 Broad St. exactly the kind of hairy ape no neighborhood needs. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: October 29, 2006
Document Link: /issues/documents/Neighborhoods/htfd_courant_102906.asp

The Back Story Tour Of Bushnell Park's Statues Approved by the city in 1854, Hartford's Bushnell Park became the nation's first publicly funded park. It was not an easy road. Local businessmen opposed the plan to spend a considerable amount of public money on the project. Not to mention that the space allotted for it was occupied at the time by a garbage dump, pig sties and tanneries. No doubt you've used the park often, especially the area that holds the carousel and the Pump House Gallery. Perhaps you've wondered about the story behind some of the Bushnell's monuments. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: August 20, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_082010.asp

The Bushnell Celebrates 80 Years Of Magical Moments The Bushnell Center for the Performing Arts is celebrating its 80th season. The theater has solicited memories from patrons as part of its "Tell Us Your Story" campaign. The submissions told various stories — of a 10-year-old boy receiving a subscription to the Travel Series from his grandmother; of a husband and wife meeting during a performance of "Wicked"; of a woman accidentally running into President John F. Kennedy after his speech at the Bushnell Memorial in 1961. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: May 06, 2011
Document Link: /issues/documents/artsandculture/htfd_courant_050611.asp

The Coltsville Scoop In this editorial, the Courant expresses the opinion that the more enthusiasm Connecticut can show for having a national park in Coltsville, the better its chances of being approved. That fact has not been lost on the many scholars, historians, planners and politicians who have been working for years toward a national park designation. Some of them, along with the Hartford Preservation Alliance, have collaborated on an entertaining series of lectures and tours to enlighten the public about the fascinating Colt legacy. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: May 14, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_051408.asp

The Constitution Plaza Hotel — Historic? The Urban Renewal-era design of Hartford's Constitution Plaza has been called many things since the 1960s, not all of them flattering. But historic? The long-vacant building that was a 12-story hotel, known by several names, was recently listed on the State Register of Historic Places and appears to be headed for the national designation as well, clearing the way for the new owners to seek historic tax credits to help finance the hotel's conversion to 199 apartments. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: March 20, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/downtowndevelopment/htfd_courant_032012.asp

The Dutch Put Hartford On The Map Had it not been for the Dutch fort, Hartford would not have been the place selected for settlement. This article provides a short history of the Dutch in Hartford and explains how Adriaen's Landing and Dutch Point symbolize why we are in this place today. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: November 20, 2005
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_112005.asp

The Gilded Age Of Hartford At Twain House An exhibit, "The Gilded Age Of Hartford," is on display at Mark Twain House & Museum, 351 Farmington Ave. in Hartford, until Monday, Sept. 2, 2013. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: March 14, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_031413_1.asp

The Grand Old Game If you think baseball has gotten too expensive, corporate and technical, and long for the pure, simple game of the past, the distant past, The Friends of Vintage Base Ball are here to help. Every Saturday, the group runs vintage base ball games at the Hartford Base Ball Grounds at the corner of Hendricxsen Avenue and Masseek Street in Colt Park. The players wear authentic uniforms and use either 1860s or 1880s rules, depending on the teams. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: July 12, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/economicdevelopment/htfd_courant_071210.asp

The Hartford Begins Demolition Of Former MassMutual Building Excavating machines started clawing at the former MassMutual building on Hartford's Garden Street recently as work begins on splitting the nearly 500,000-square-foot structure in two. The Hartford Financial Services Group Inc. bought the 16-acre property in July for $9.1 million. The insurance company said it intends to preserve the oldest part of the building, about 40,000 square feet that is just across the street from its headquarters. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: January 27, 2009
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_012709.asp

The Hartford Marks Its 200th Anniversary The property-casualty and life insurer now called The Hartford Financial Services Group Inc. recently celebrated 200 years since its creation. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: May 10, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/economicdevelopment/htfd_courant_051010.asp

The Home Of An Era In Hartford As Hartford Stage opens a show dedicated to the life of Chick Austin, the museum he memorably directed is also touching base with its past. The Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art plans a four-month exhibit focusing on Austin's legendary Scarborough Street house, as well as his cultural significance in Hartford. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: October 14, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/artsandculture/htfd_courant_101407_4.asp

The New History Center at Bulkeley High School The new History Center at Bulkeley High School contains many trophies of sports victories won over the past 87 years. Like those sports victories, the creation of the History Center was the result of teamwork, a tale of one person after another picking up the ball and advancing it down the field. Published by The Hartford News ; Publication Date: October 10, 2013
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_news_101013.asp

The Projects, From Promise To Curse The era of public housing in Hartford came to an end recently with the groundbreaking for new housing that will replace last of the city's early 1940s housing projects, Nelton Court, in the North End. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: November 21, 2010
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_112110.asp

The Red-Hot Hartford Mama Sophie Tucker rose from the streets of Hartford to become one of the most famous singing stars in the world, but she never forgot her hometown. Now her hometown is remembering her in an exhibit which opened recently at the Jewish Historical Society of Greater Hartford. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: June 3, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/History/htfd_courant_060307.asp

The Woman Who Put Life In Cedar Hill Irene McHugh always liked cemeteries. As the executive assistant to the executive director of Hartford's venerable Cedar Hill Cemetery, she launched the popular Tea and Sympathy program on Victorian mourning etiquette, along with many other programs. She retired at the end of May 2008. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: May 21, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/parks/htfd_courant_052108.asp

Thelma Dickerson, Founder of Hartford's Jumoke Academy, Dies At 87 Thelma Ellis Dickerson, an outspoken educator who became president of the Hartford school board and founded Jumoke Academy in her golden years, died Saturday, February 18, 2012. She was 87. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: February 20, 2012
Document Link: /issues/documents/education/htfd_courant_022012.asp

Time To Decide What Colt Dome Says About Hartford One of Hartford's most frustrating questions — what is it going to do with the proud old Colt Building and its iconic blue dome? — is edging closer to an answer Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: July 27, 2011
Document Link: /issues/documents/history/htfd_courant_072711.asp

Timothy's Says Goodbye Timothy Otte’s last day as the owner of Timothy’s Restaurant was Friday, March 2, 2007. He said he remains convinced that now is the perfect time to leave the restaurant, and its stuff, behind. Published by The Hartford Courant ; Publication Date: March 3, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/Neighborhoods/htfd_courant_030307.asp

To the Rescue After the Connecticut Historical Society warned in February 2007 that without financial help it would have to shut the Old State House down at the end of June, the governor and legislature both rushed in with proposals to rescue it. But there’s disagreement about just how the rescue should be made. Published by The Hartford Advocate ; Publication Date: May 3, 2007
Document Link: /issues/documents/History/htfd_advocate_050307.asp

Tom Parrish’s Station For over fifteen years in the 1950s and 60s, “Tom’s Service Station,” in the Hartford Clay Arsenal neighborhood, was a place where many of Tom Parrish’s friends, customers and people from all walks of life, tended to congregate. People went to “Tom’s” for news, comradeship, support and guidance, and to discuss current events among themselves. Published by Northend Agent's ; Publication Date: April 1, 2008
Document Link: /issues/documents/neighborhoods/northend_agents_040108.asp

Tony Passacantando: A Hardworking Man, Strong And Gentle